what kind of ash is it?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by sea, Jun 8, 2014.

  1. sea

    sea Member

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    labelled as Sorbus aucuparia "Red Cascade"
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Like all true-to-name examples of 'Dwarfcrown' it belongs to Sorbus americana.

    Your tree has pale leaves, probably needs some help with the soil conditions. Before applying anything try to find out what the exact problem is, down here this would best be done by getting help from the nearest USDA Cooperative Extension Serivice office with sampling the soil and having it analyzed by a soils lab.
     
  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    Hello sea,

    So it looks like you have got an American native Sorbus americana, not the European native Sorbus aucuparia you were looking for (http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=83096). Keep it if you like it, but if you are not completely happy you can return it, mislabeling is a good enough reason for that.

    I believe it is still in the pot or freshly planted so don't be alarmed that there is anything wrong with your soil, your other plants look green enough. It should get better after planting. Be careful to examine the root ball and release or prune any circling roots if it is root bound before planting it. After planting water it well.
     
  4. sea

    sea Member

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    It was not that expensive to return it, and I am quite happy I found anything at this price. To me, there is no difference between Aucuparia and Americana. Some people here suggested me buying local variety instead of European ones, so it may be even good that I bought this one. The nursery where I purchased it is not far from my house, so just out of interest I will go there to inform them of mislabeling.

    Yes, I cut the root ball several times on the sides to open it up and let the roots grow out of it. Soil is perfect and if it dies it won't because of the soil.

    To Ron_B: did not find the link you mentioned (a link to the introducing nursery's color illustrated pages on 'Dwarfcrown' to this thread yesterday at 11:03 AM). Probably, moderators deleted it.

    Thank you everybody!
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It is of course a rowan (Sorbus), not an ash (Fraxinus) ;-)

    I'd agree (well I think it was me said so in the first place ;-) it certainly makes good sense to have the local native species, it is better for wildlife, and may also be better adapted to the local climate.
    That's a good idea; and remind them that as it is the North American species, they can sell it as a native to people who value native plants.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Sorbus americana is an Eastern North American species.

    Red Cascade is a trademark used to sell Sorbus americana 'Dwarfcrown'. S. aucuparia produces different leaves and buds etc. The other is a form of Vaccinium corymbosum, that also exhibits parts characteristic of that species, and not like those of V. myrtillus.

    http://www.jfschmidt.com/introductio...ade/index.html
     
  7. sea

    sea Member

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    this link is not valid... I will watch the tree throughout the year as this is the only way for me to see what berries and leaves will look like later :(
     
  8. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    The American Mountain Ash berries are bigger than those of European species and turn true red. The leaves turn yellow-orangish in the autumn.
     
  9. sea

    sea Member

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    time will show :)
     
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Depends on which book you read!
     

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  11. sea

    sea Member

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    Is there anything about Sorbus Americana Red Cascade? I only need to know the autumn color of berries and leaves.
     
  12. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not in that book, it only deals with species, not cultivars.
     
  13. sea

    sea Member

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    I see.
     
  14. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Unidentified reference showing Sorbus americana coming all the way across to the Pacific unorthodox.

    No idea what "this link is not valid" is supposed to mean.
     
  15. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    "The webpage cannot be found."

    Maybe try this to get to the page showing 'Red Cascade'.

    www.jfschmidt.com/introductions
     
  16. sea

    sea Member

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    thank you everybody
     
  17. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Last time I checked the original linked worked, now I see it doesn't anymore - and that was the problem.
     
  18. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    For everyone's reference here is a link to the etry for "Sorbus" in eflora bc, which is the most authoritative BC guide of which I know - apart from the Flora of BC in 8 or more large printed volumes:

    http://linnet.geog.ubc.ca/DB_Query/...vStatus=Both&sort=a.Family&f=1&oneword=sorbus

    BC species are:

    S. aucuparia "Sorbus aucuparia is considered an emerging invasive species in the Vancouver region"
    S. scopulina. Native - Basically found in the interior of BC
    S. sitchensis. Native - Occurs on the coast.

    From this we gather that as of this date S. americana, if it occurs in the wild in BC, is not considered to be part of the flora.
     
  19. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    I'm not sure it means anything at all, but several people have piled-in here about the various species/varieties, their origins and their occurrence in BC and people's gardens :)

    Personally I have a young Sorbus aucuparia in my backyard and "emerging invasive" or not, it's going to keep growing there for a few years. I enjoy seeing the flowers, the fruit and this year, the robin that sits on a branch and shouts at everyone.

    I hope you enjoy your tree, and I am sure you will eventually find out exactly what it is.
     
  20. sea

    sea Member

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    where did you get your young Sorbus aucuparia? I live in Port Coquitlam.
     
  21. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The robin isn't shouting at everyone, it is shouting at you to pull the tree out.

    There is no reason to think the specimen asked about here in not a 'Dwarfcrown'.
     
  22. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    "emerging invasive" remember? It just started growing. Probably from a seed that a robin pooped-out. If you look around the edge of vacant lots, untended bits of land you will see one I am sure. Why not stick with the one you have? It looks nicer than mine.

    As for as me pulling the tree out, Ron. I would have to discuss that with my wife, and I believe the result is a foregone conclusion. It is growing to block the view of an ugly shed on the neighbour's property, as seen from the kitchen window. I'll work on it.
     
  23. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It isn't, it is shouting "what lovely fruit" - and therein lies the reason European Rowan is invasive in N Americe, birds enjoy the fruit and spread the seeds ;-)
     
  24. sea

    sea Member

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    Looking at the BC landscapes around me, I often feel myself like in Russia, just until people start speaking (English, of course), and I return to alien (to me) North America :)))
     
  25. sea

    sea Member

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    To Ron: how does the foliage look now, Ron? To me it seems to be deeper green now (not yellowish as it was before).
     

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