What is this

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by mariel, Jun 9, 2021 at 4:50 PM.

  1. mariel

    mariel Member

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    I have been told that this is the invasive daphne laurel but from photos I’ve seen it appears different to me. The flower is not the same at all. Could someone let me know so I know if I should remove it all please. Thank you in advance
     

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  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Euphorbia of some type.
     
  3. hiking Pat

    hiking Pat Active Member

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    If the lower middle plant looks like Leafy Spurge - Euphorbia ensula = invasive in Alberta
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I think you might have both in the photo... the whorls of leaves do look like they might be spurge-laurel (Daphne laureola) but the upright inflorescences are, as Eric and Pat said, a Euphorbia. There are many species of Euphorbia in cultivation locally, so I'd need to see more to positively ID.

    If you don't like them in that space, then yes, you can remove them -- in fact, I'd say you'd have to remove both at the same time, since you'll be gearing up in protective equipment in order to do the work. The sap of both Daphne laureola and (most) Euphorbia can cause significant skin reactions, to the point of hospitalization--which I don't think you'd want to happen, but especially not right now. At a minimum, I would think gloves, an old long-sleeved shirt and pants that can be washed a couple times post-removal, and eye goggles. You would also want to be sure not to touch your face or other exposed skin (e.g., neck, ears) with your gloves while working.

    I would probably find some sort of pruning shear that can snip the base of the plant from a working distance, and then deal with any underground removals after the cut foliage is removed from the area.
     
  5. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae is commonly planted in Vancouver. It looks a lot like that one. I have often mistaken it for Daphne laureola at first glance when seen without flowers. It's usually a good idea to keep euphorbias in control anyway.
     
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  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Agree with Mrs. Robb's bonnet, grew it for a time at the previous place and the new one has it along the front walk. In addition to creeping to form a patch it reseeds to a certain extent in cultivated settings.
     

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