Unknown deciduous shrub, possibly tree sapling

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by 7104eversfield, Jul 22, 2007.

  1. 7104eversfield

    7104eversfield Member

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    Please let me know what this is.
    It is a woody volunteer sapling (probably, but maybe a shrub) and is growing quite rapidly - maybe 6" per year. The photo shows the entire, ~3ft plant on 22 July. The stem is red. Leaves are ~3" x 1.5", ovate-spathulate, with parallel veins. The leaves are asymmetric having a few but variable number of medium-sized serrations on the upper part, never more than 4 either side, sometimes more on one side than the other, and sometimes none.
    In the spring the margins of the leaves were tinged red, but this has now gone. The side branches form whorls since the early branches are crowded on the lower part of each year's main stem growth.
    Thanks
    Steve
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Nyssa sylvatica, a choice ornamental.
     
  3. Ken R

    Ken R Active Member

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    Ron,

    Some of the leaves look toothed. I don't think of Nyssa sylvatica as having toothed leaves.

    But I've also learned that you are seldom wrong.

    Does Nyssa sylvatica sometimes have toothed leaves?

    - Ken
     
  4. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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  5. Ken R

    Ken R Active Member

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    Thanks, Chris.

    Amazing what you can learn around here.
     
  6. 7104eversfield

    7104eversfield Member

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    Many thanks. I am not familiar with the sapling stage of N. sylvatica.
    Steve
     

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