Shrub with hairy elliptic opposite leaves, white inflorescences

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by wcutler, Mar 6, 2019.

  1. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Now that I have ruled out Cotoneaster and Photinia because this shrub has opposite leaves, I am thinking Viburnum, but I'm not finding one with such hairy leaves as this. It's a very early bloomer; the photos were taken February 27.
    Shrub-white-inflorescences_See-em-iaLaneBute_Cutler_20190227_134522.jpg Shrub-white-inflorescences_See-em-iaLaneBute_Cutler_20190227_134532.jpg Shrub-white-inflorescences_See-em-iaLaneBute_Cutler_20190227_134557.jpg Shrub-white-inflorescences_See-em-iaLaneBute_Cutler_20190227_134604.jpg Shrub-white-inflorescences_See-em-iaLaneBute_Cutler_20190227_134658.jpg

    It's funny to me, I read a Facebook posting a while ago on how there is a definite order for modifiers in English, and I am not at all sure that I am following the rules in my subject line, but somehow, I just doubt anything I could find would exactly cover this set. What I've written seems wrong, though.
     
  2. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

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    VIBURNUM  TINUS  GWENLLIAN 16-03-2009 10-48-48.JPG At the risk of being wrong again .....I am going with Viburnum tinus...evergreen, early to flower. Leaves can be hairy.

    Viburnum tinus - Trees and Shrubs Online

    Quote from above......

    "V. tinus is a very variable species in the size and shape of its leaves, in the presence or absence of hairs from the young growths, petioles and the undersides and margins of the leaves, as well as in the size and density of the inflorescence"
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2019
  3. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Oh dear, I posted a Viburnum tinus var. rigidum for ID, ten years ago, but I do still remember the name. And the fruits. But I didn't remember the leaves or the hairs.
    Viburnum? Maybe rigidum or tinus?.
    In that thread, @Ron B suggested it was the cultivar 'Compactum'. I guess the one in the thread here, that I just posted, does not have a mounded form, so it the basic Lauristinus (I just learned that word).

    Thanks, Silver surfer.
     
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  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Ditto to Viburnum tinus.
     
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  5. hortiphoto

    hortiphoto Active Member 10 Years

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    Viburnum rhytidophyllum has indumentum on the foliage but its leaves are much more heavily textured. Viburnum tinus usually just has fine hairs and scales. Given the way the flowers are carried, too, it almost looks like a hybrid between tinus and rhytidophyllum. Is the such a thing?
     
  6. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

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    Viburnum rhytidophyllum is very different in leaf shape, leaf texture, brown hairy stalks, flower shape etc .I am not seeing anything in wcutlers pics to make me think it is related to Viburnum rhytidophyllum

    Pics below are all Viburnum rhytidophyllum


    VIBURNUM  RHYTIDOPHYLLUM 17-10-2009 14-49-05.JPG VIBURNUM  RHYTIDOPHYLLUM 17-10-2009 14-50-26.JPG VIBURNUM  RHYTIDOPHYLLUM 17-10-2009 14-50-34.jpg VIBURNUM  RHYTIDOPHYLLUM 28-09-2010 12-38-05.JPG VIBURNUM  RHYTIDOPHYLLUM 28-09-2010 12-38-24.JPG VIBURNUM  RHYTIDOPHYLLUM 22-05-2010 13-14-48.JPG VIBURNUM  RHYTIDOPHYLLUM 15-08-2009 12-05-57.JPG
     

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