Pretty tree

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by daisyh, Mar 14, 2007.

  1. daisyh

    daisyh Member

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    Location:
    Gilbert AZ, USA
    I saw this beautiful tree in downtown Phoenix, AZ. Please help ID because I want to plant one in my back yard. It's a small tree with white flowers. Please help! P1000317.JPG

    P1000331.JPG
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Quince (Cydonia oblonga).
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Apple tree (Malus domestica). Thousands of named varieties, plus many unlabeled trees casually encountered may be unnamed seedlings growing from discarded fruits or planted originally as seedling rootstocks beneath grafted, named varieties that failed and left the rootstock to grow its own top in their place. If this one is being cross-pollinated and fruiting you will have to see those when mature in summer or fall to begin to find out which particular one it might be. But, any apple tree will produce the same general effect in spring. Choosing modern varieties recommended for your area (you usually need more than one kind for cross-pollination, if you wish to have fruit) will give you similar-looking trees during flowering time. Choose those on dwarfing rootstocks (most offered today are) to get mature specimens that are as small as this one.

    Could also be a crabapple (Malus), in which case it will have small fruits, perhaps not edible. Hundreds of kinds of those, with different varieties coming and going from general marketplace over time somewhat in the fashion of roses.

    Try picking a flowering sprig and comparing it with those of apple and crabapple trees in stock and flowering at nearby nurseries or other labeled collections, such as public gardens.
     
  4. oscar

    oscar Active Member

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    you sure ron? the trunk and stems dont look quite right for a malus, don't they normally have flaking, crusty bark, compared to the fissured, grey looking bark on this tree, also isn't phoenix a bit hot for malus to thrive, I seem to recall a guy from texas having apple problems because of the heat.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    You can click on her(?) pictures for some nice close-up views. The bark was one of the things that made me think it was an orchard apple.
     
  6. dmurchie

    dmurchie Member

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    It is a neat looking tree.

    My vote is not for quince.

    Reasons:
    -Leaves appear variegated, I don't think quince leaves are variegated. (cydonia oblonga)
    -Leaves don't appear to have the distinctive silver fur of quince on them (hard to tell from photo)
    -Leaf growth pattern isn't very quincy. (quince leaves are alternate I think. Growth looks more "whorlish" in the photos)
    -It would be even prettier if it was a quince.


    The above being said, who can account for all the varieties, crosses, climate and photograph peculiarities.
     

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