Please help me identify this plant

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Chris Gonzaga, Jul 21, 2021.

  1. Chris Gonzaga

    Chris Gonzaga New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I'm hoping someone can help identify this plant that's growing in my baseboard!

    Thanks,
    Chris
     

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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I want to note for people who might not read what sounds like a mold posting that this is a green plant, not a mold.

    Chris, welcome to the forums. I'm assuming this is an outside wall. Can you locate and reply with photos of anything growing outside your building in this area that has leaves this shape (possibly much larger) with the leaves growing opposite each other the way these do? If there are flowers or fruit, include photos of that as well.
     
  3. Chris Gonzaga

    Chris Gonzaga New Member

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    This is actually an inside wall. The house is less than a year old. I haven't opened the wall yet but from the outside the concrete foundation where this plant is growing looks fine. Attached is a close up of the leaves. I can't find anything similar on the property, but attached is a photo of another plant growing about 6 feet away from the foundation.
     

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  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It's not the same plant as the one outdoors. The indoor ones have opposite leaves. Unfortunately, these are so etiolated (stretched out abnormally) due to lack of sunlight, that they will not readily look like something someone may be familiar with, even if it is a common plant.

    I would guess it has to be a tree or shrub with a large seed in order for it to have that much energy reserve in the seed to grow to this length. Do you have any trees or shrubs outside with oppositely-arranged leaves (i.e., paired on opposite sides of the stems)
     
  5. Chris Gonzaga

    Chris Gonzaga New Member

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    This is what we found behind the baseboard. It looks like it's growing through the small gap between the floor and the foundation. Does anyone have any recommendation for a non-toxic herbicide or other treatment? I would like to avoid using harsh herbicides because my family is sensitive to chemicals.

    Thanks,
    Chris
     

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  6. Chris Gonzaga

    Chris Gonzaga New Member

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    Thanks for the reply Daniel. Do you have any recommendation on how to get rid of this plant? The contractor wants to use herbicide but I think we need help from a horticulturalist with weed control experience.
     
  7. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    These are almost certain to go away on their own -- the plants / seedlings will exhaust their energy reserves, and wither. If these were more green, I'd be concerned that they were attached to a plant that is also growing outdoors and receiving sufficient light to support the growth indoors... but since they look in such bad shape already, it looks more like a last gasp. The only way they might persist is if they have better exposure to light.

    Just handpull / snip / prune what's there -- that will accelerate exhausting them.
     
  8. Chris Gonzaga

    Chris Gonzaga New Member

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    Hi Daniel, thank you for sharing your knowledge and insights, we appreciate all the information. We are relieved to know we don't need to use herbicides. Many thanks! Chris
     
  9. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Chris, the fact that these plants grew at all probably indicates a moisture problem in the wall or wherever the plants originated. This could lead to serious consequences later on.
     
  10. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Keeping in mind that everything on earth is chemical, it's completely subjective to decide which are too harsh for your family. I use glyphosate once in a while for weeds I cannot eradicate any other way. Search 'Glyphosate Toxicity' for numerous reports including this: Glyphosate / published under the joint sponsorship of the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Labour Organisation, and the World Health Organization

    Whatever it is growing inside the baseboards of your house looks innocuous enough but you'd better believe it must be extremely aggressive to be growing there at all.
     
  11. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Contributor

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    A couple of thoughts to add -

    If this is a new house built from scratch - isn’t there a home warrantee? I would be initiating a file in case further issues « crop up » (so to speak, just had to say it)

    As another frequent contributor noted - this plant may be the result of some water or damp areas which can be a major consideration later — you know, when the Warantee is finished.

    ——-
    Also - that outdoor plant appears to be the all too common invasive « bindweed » (morning glory) ... and its roots can infiltrate paved driveways and choke a hedge cedar if left to run season after season.

    It is likely there because it arrived in top soil / gravel —- or was on your property prior to build and just got churned in to the soil and is now finding its way in to your life.

    It can grow from small bits of root so dispose in your garbage never your compost.
     

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