outdoor Norfolk Island Pine

Discussion in 'Araucariaceae' started by Adrian, Mar 17, 2004.

  1. Adrian

    Adrian Member

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    I was given an indoor Norfolk Island Pine recently (3 trunks, tallest about 5 ft), and I am keeping in outdoors. I'd really like to know what this plant needs to live outdoors in a Vancouver climate. How much sun do they need? I can give it eastern and 1/2 southern exposure, or just eastern, or mostly shade. Which is best? Can these plants thrive outdoors in Vancouver? Can I separate the trunks? I'm a little worried about it since some branches are yellowing a bit at the tips.
     
  2. Antonin

    Antonin Member

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    not hardy

    Hey Adrian,

    Unfortunately Norfolk Pines are not hardy in our region, our region being a zone 8b and Norfolk Pine being zone 10-11. I would suspect, that if the tree is outside right now, that the yellowing is because it is to cold for it. Here is a link that sums up a little about the tree: http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/trees/ARAHETA.pdf

    cheers,

    Antonin
     
  3. Even though I know that the pines won't grow in Kansas normally...
    Will they grow in the ground during the summer? I would like to plant mine in the ground in my courtyard for the summer months. We are in Zone 5. The information I have says it can live in full sun but I am thinking...not Kansas Sun. I have grown them in pots outside but would like to put some in the ground to be taken out next fall. Will I kill em or will they thrive? Thanks for your help
    Cindy
     
  4. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Cindy,

    Sink the pot with the plant in it into the ground. The sun in Kansas isn't nearly as close to the earth as it is in the plant's native land. Get it accostumed to the sun slowly. Plants sunburn like people do.

    Newt
     
  5. i planted a norfolk pine outside in san antonio tx three weeks ago. it is doing fine and took to the transplanting. some of the top tips are starting to turn yellow i thinks it is because i was out of town for two days. is south central texas ok for it to surive the summer.
     
  6. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  7. i planted a norfolk pine outside in san antonio tx three weeks ago. it is doing fine and took to the transplanting. some of the top tips are starting to turn yellow i thinks it is because i was out of town for two days. is south central texas ok for it to surive the summer. july and aug are scorchers
     
  8. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Natalie,

    If you read my post to the last unregistered person who is in the same place as you are and has the same problems, I gave a link for the info on the tree and a site to get your hardiness zone. I think you'll find it won't survive your winters, but reading the links is definately required for further info.

    Newt
     
  9. I live in coastal Georgia and have found that my Norfolk Island Pines do quite well outside in partial shade and sun. We have long, hot summers and very little cold weather. If covered my plants have done well to down to the low thirties. I bring them in if it is going into the 20s. They have really thrived outside and doubled in growth in the past two years. Thank you for all of the information. I have been wondering how tall they can grow. I have one that is over 6 feet and one almost 5 feet.
    mjg
     
  10. I guess I'm really out of luck then. I just bought a 'cute' Norfolk Pine in a 6" pot and thought after Christmas I'd plant it out doors. I live in CANADA! Sounds like I'm going to be shopping on boxing day for a nice indoor pot to transplant it to. :)
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Leaves have little ability to adjust to radical changes in light exposure. Plants adjust by growing new shoots up into the stronger light from within a shaded position. This is why it is suggested to stand a small piece of wood or other shadow-casting object next to recent transplants that have come out of a sheltered area that has less intense sun.

    Many houseplants are probably better off being kept in the house all of the time. Indoor-outdoor plants may emit unpleasant critters when brought back inside. Pots plunged into ordinary ground may result in rotting roots, especially if the surrounding soil is heavy, as well as pick up critters.
     
  12. I had bought a Norfolk Pine at WalMart to put at my sons grave at Thanksgiving time. My intentions were to leave it there until after Christmas and then bring it home and plant it. I just went and picked it up to bring home to plant it. I got onto here and stumbled onto this site while trying to find about the tree. From what I am understanding it does not do well outside. I live in Missouri, it has been out at the cemetary in the snow and ice and is still soft and green.
    Do you think it will survive me going ahead and planting it outside here at my home?

    Thanks,
    Lisa
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Sorry, not a hope. It is probably already dead, despite the green and soft appearance.
     
  14. My husband and I inherited a Norfolk Pine from his late grandmother. The tree is doing quite well and has about 5 "layers" of branches (if that is what you call it). There is A LOT of empty space between the top of the soil and the bottom row of branches, is this normal? Most pics that I have seen show it having the rows of branches starting very close to the soil layer. Also, how large is this tree going to grow...the pot we have it in is about 1.5 feet across and the tree is about 4 feet tall. Is it going to get much taller than this as we live in a small apartment and are moving to a small house soon, where I was going to plant it outside - but after reading some earlier threads found out it does not survive in this region (Toronto, Ontario). Just wondering how to take care of it properly and how large it is going to get?
    Thank you.
     
  15. Re: not hardy

    what is meant by zone? i just got a norfolk pine for christmas. i live in portland, oregon. does the tree have a chance?
     
  16. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    To Unregistered Guest,

    This site explains hardiness zones as well as a zip code zone finder for yours.
    http://www.garden.org/zipzone/

    If you reread all the posts you will find your answer once you know your zone.

    Newt
     
  17. dogseadepression

    dogseadepression Active Member

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    Newt, I have a Norifolk Island pine That I have purchased at walmart in Illinois last year and is doing very well I am planning on entering my pine in a plant contest on June 2006 and hoping to keep this pine fore a long time till I move to florida down the road will it grow very tall by then? Thanks Wyatt Reinhart Macomb IL
     
  18. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Wyatt,

    Sounds like you have a beautiful specimin. Since you don't say when you will be moving it would be impossible to say if your tree will stay small enough "down the road". You can help to keep it small by not repotting often or over feeding. There's several helpful links in this thread. Here's another that should be helpful. Look especially at 'How do I repot a Norfolk Island pine?' about halfway down the page.
    http://www.bachmans.com/retail/tipsheets/indoor_plants/NorfolkIslandPines.cfm

    This should be helpful as well.
    http://mrec.ifas.ufl.edu/Foliage/folnotes/norfolk.htm
    Newt
     
  19. Michael15r

    Michael15r Member

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    Hello, I got my Norfolk pine during mid December. Kept it inside until Feb, and now I'm thinking about planting this wonderful tree in my back yard in the open yard. I already had it outside for about a month now it I believe its growing great in my conditions. I am not going to plant it just yet. Since I feel it may die from reading all these post on this page. here are a couple of pictures of the tree tell me what you guys think? Dead Alive? dieing slowly..? any comments are well appreciated..


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    I've notice in the pass month; strong growth (growing rapidly) and additionally yellow tips? I live in Stockton, California were my zone is 7 I think? If I'm wrong pleasse do correct me. Thanks
     
  20. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Michael,

    I suspect you used the link I supplied to another poster to get your hardiness zone. Apparently it's not working properly as I suspect you are in zone 9, much warmer. Try this one.
    http://www.gardenweb.com/zones/zip.cgi

    Even with you being in a warmer zone, they are only rated to zone 10, so it might not survive your winters if they get cold enough.

    The yellowing could be from a micronutrient deficiency.
    http://www.ppath.cas.psu.edu/EXTENSION/PLANT_DISEASE/norfolk.html

    Low humidity or not enough water can also be the cause of yellowing tips.
    http://www.bachmans.com/retail/tipsheets/indoor_plants/NorfolkIslandPines.cfm

    Newt
     
  21. Michael15r

    Michael15r Member

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    Hello there Newt,

    Well this afternoon I was a bit worried about the tree and checked out the soil and it was a bit moisted, But I did water it before the night came in, but now its raining outside right now, I'm trying to leave it outside to adapt my conditions. Just checked on the link below and that's right I'm zone 9 so I'm warmer.. LoL.. I guess that's good. Even though I'm just one zone under you still think this tree will not live? Its very weird.. Because every morning I go on jogs and I see many people in the front porch have the tree but in a pot and its bigger than mines. About 7ft at the most I've seen. It's weird. That's why I wanted to plant mines out on the lawn. What I was going to do is add some good soil for it that it likes and at bark to keep moister in. Here is were I wanted to put it.

    http://www.imgbox.co.uk/uploads/f657c3f524.jpg

    You said and what the link you gave me about the tips getting yellow, What is Micro nutrient deficiency, searched it and nothing came up that was useful. Maybe you can explain this for me. Thank you for your help, hope to hear from you very soon.
     
  22. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Michael, sounds like alot of water to me. Plants need to adjust to a change from indoors to outdoors slowly. They get sunburn and windburn just like we do. You might want to consider moving it to a protected spot for now. Your pot also looks a bit small for the size of the tree.

    Keep in mind that this tree will get HUGE eventually. I would suggest you find a corner of the yard and read those sites I gave others VERY closely about mature height and width. Do look at those pictures of the mature trees. I wouldn't plant a tree like that in that spot. It will eventually dwarf everything else.

    I'm thinking the ones you see in pots on porches and decks are houseplants in cold weather and brought outside in the warmer weather. There is a great difference in the weather here in Maryland. It was 34*F this morning.

    When you plant don't ammend the soil in the hole. The roots will tend to stay in the ammended soil and not spread out into the native soil. That is not a good thing.
    http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/plantsci/trees/f1147w.htm

    Newt
     
  23. Michael15r

    Michael15r Member

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    The pot it is in is the pot I got when I got the tree, just a cheap black plastic 4 to 5 inch. I've read lots of information about how big they get to how much sun they get and where they are really from of course Norfolk.. lol.. So I already know a lot of information about this tree, but I get a lot of different answers on how it can survive. Some websites say it can barely stay alive in cold weather while others will say it will survive in heat and cold conditions, Which I feel very confused, then I see the tree all over my area in pots mainly. I've seen some planted to the ground but never in a open area mainly near something from a building to a fence never standing alone by its self. I suppose I should do the same? I've also read that the tree will not grow well past 100ft or so only in its native place were it grows.

    What do you mean it will dwarf everything around it? This tree will get pretty wide or something like that? Hmm... Interesting.. I have another pine tree growing to the farthest in my last picture, but I don't even know what that pine is called. Well luckly I never planted it. Maybe I'll just buy a good size pot *(large?) and set it in the front porch like many other people in my neighborhood is doing as well.. lol this is getting funny now, I wanted to plant this tree in my back yard, but I suppose I wont for now.

    Right now the temp. outside is 9:38PM it's 59 degrees.

    I have a question for ya then; Should I move this plant out of direct sun light then as soon as tomorrow then. Help me out on this, I feel confused about all this now.. LoL.. sorry..
    Hope to hear from you very soon then.
     
  24. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Gosh Michael, you're keeping me awake!! LOL It's 3 hours later here. So, I'll open another Starbucks Frappuccino and we'll do this together. :)

    It still looks too small. General rule of thumb is the pot should be one third the height of the plant. I'd say to gently ease it out of the pot when it dries out a bit and see if it's rootbound. If you repot go with a pot 2" larger. Now I'm not sure how experienced you are at this and I've got to get some zzz's, so I'll give you links for what I think will be helpful, even though you might already know this.

    Repotting:
    http://www.dirtdoctor.com/view_question.php?id=70
    http://www.ourgardengang.com/containerpotting.htm

    I think what you'll find is if the temps get too cold, the top will die off but the roots will stay alive enough for the tree to sprout again. You're in zone 9 so you may have a chance that it will survive a cold spell that would kill the top but not the roots. Remember most of that info is a guide and there are different microclimates in each zone. The south side of a house near a brick wall will stay warmer in the winter then the north side. It's all relative.

    I've seen them grow huge in Peru and Ecuador, but the temps rarely drop below 55*F.

    Figure that at maturity in your garden it will only be about 20' wide, but it could grow to 80' tall. That's quite a large size for the average lot and because it's so narrow, will look like a great big exclamation point!
    http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/trees/ARAHETA.pdf

    Yup, if you're going to plant it. If it's a windy site I wouldn't put it near a structure.

    It's been outside long enough that you probably don't need to move it in shade now.

    Forgot to answer this before. From this site with more info available:
    http://www.agr.state.nc.us/cyber/kidswrld/plant/nutrient.htm#top

    The best thing I can think of to add the micronutrients would be compost or a liquid fertilizer with these trace elements.

    If I've missed anything just let me know. Got to catch some zzz's.
    Newt
     
  25. Michael15r

    Michael15r Member

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    Well hello there,

    I want to say that you have saved my pine tree. Thank you for all your help, every information was needed greatly. I found a large pot in my storage and it's big enough for sure. :-) Thank you very much for your help it was greatly appreciate always well needed! I also learned a lot from your links above. I was thinking not to plant the tree anytime soon in my yard since I have no idea where I will be putting this tree at the moment only in the south side location of my house which will receive more sun during the winter months. Right now it's in front of my porch in a large pot growing well and I'm going to add some good micronutrients my buddy let me have. So I would love to say this again to ya NewT! Thank you very much!
     

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