mystery plants

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by lainyg, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    I've been able to identify most of the plants in our yard with the help of friends but some have me stumped. Any help will be appreciated.

    1. We noticed this odd looking shoot growing near one of the maples just the other day. There are about 4 or 5 of them, the tallest is currently about a foot tall. They weren't there a couple weeks ago!

    2. This tree is about 12' high and about 12' around and has a nut or berry.

    3. It's hard for me to get a picture of this base of this. It's very long and gangly. I can't quite call it a tree because it doesn't have one trunk but rather a bunch of woody stems that seem to go on forever. You can see the stems in the lower right corner of the picture. It grows up and over the gazebo. We hacked back quite a bit of it in March but you wouldn't know it now.

    4. I'm wondering if this is a weed? It's about 15" tall and hiding one of my smaller rose bushes.

    5. This was hiding behind the rhodo we just moved. Maybe raspberry or blackberry? There isn't much to it and it's no more than 2' tall right now.

    Thanks!
     

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    Last edited: Jun 2, 2012
  2. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    1. Aroid of some kind
    2. Styrax parhaps
    3. Philadelphus
     
  3. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    1. Arisaema sp. Need leaves to attempt any sort of id.
    2. Styrax sp.
    3. Philadelphus sp.
    4. ?
    5. Looks like Corylus avellana. Hazel.
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Can you come back with photos of #4 when those flower buds open? It will be much easier for us to tell then.
     
  5. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    Sure can. Darn things seem to be taking forever!

    Thanks...I'll look those up :)
     
  6. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    #1 really had me kind of creeped out but now it has started to open and I can see it's not a cow's horn. :) After looking at a bunch of arisaema pictures, I'm really looking forward to seeing what it is.
     

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    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Wouldn't be surprised if this turned into Dracunculus vulgaris, the usual plant of this type encountered on properites down here.
     
  8. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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  9. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    But don't those stink? I'd rather it was exotic and foreign. Lol
     
  10. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Arisaema don't smell so hot either. Chock it up to plants that use flies and beetles to pollinate 'em.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Dragon arum smells of dead rats at first but then becomes inoffensive while the inflorescence is still fresh. Christopher Lloyd wrote of using it as a cut flower, once past the initial stinky phase. It is about the most dramatic of these, after certain Amorphophallus, and is also not so tender. The inflorescence is pretty large and the fruit, which you don't see getting much attention is actually pretty wild - a kind of fluorescent orange corn cob.
     
  12. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    Updated pics of my stinky plant. So glad to read that I have the smell of dead rats to look forward to! I'm curious to know...is this something the previous home owner might have planted? Is there a benefit to having it in a garden of mostly roses? (We thought it was odd to have garlic planted with roses until we learned that it helps keep aphids away.) It's strange that it's nowhere else in the yard and I've never seen it in the area before. I'll let it bloom this year (like everything else) but if it doesn't have any redeeming qualities it will have a date with my shovel!
     

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    Last edited: Jun 10, 2012
  13. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    #4 still hasn't bloomed, but it has grown. Here are a couple of updated pics. My gut is telling me to pull it, my head says, find out what it is first!
     

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  14. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Those heads are starting to make me think #4 might be a Centaurea....
     
  15. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    I pulled a bunch of them (#4) not all of them but they were totally taking over a small rose.

    Updated pic of #1 makes me think that Silver surfer's initial id may have been correct.
     

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  16. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Yes.. Definitely an Arisaema!
    A really nice one. Enjoy!
    I have never noticed any smell from them.

    I love them and grow several sp.
    They will slowly form clumps.
    Once planted they are trouble free and will come up reliably each year.
    Collecting different ones can be slightly addictive.

    Some have 3 leaflets, others have leaves like a cartwheel.eg Arisaema consanguineum.

    http://www.rainyside.com/images/bulbs/Arisaema_consanguineum06271002.jpg

    Some will set huge heads of red seed.

    http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5228/5598991108_ea7b78da16.jpg

    Others have rather spectacular spadix, such as Arisaema griffithii pradhanii.
    Arisaema sikokianum is another special!

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=...urce=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=t_3WT9OYI9K28QOg1YHKCA

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=....,cf.osb&fp=1711978870ffdd01&biw=1536&bih=776
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2012
  17. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    Is that Arisaema something that the OP's previous homeowners would have planted? or would that have just blown into her garden? That's really neat. Never knew you could grow things like that in the PNW.
     
  18. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    Thanks Silver Surfer! There are several of them (6-8) but this is the largest. The smallest is no more than a few inches tall and is starting to open up.

    I wonder the same thing. Everything else around here is pretty common so it seems a little out of place. :)
     
  19. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    Mystery plant #4 buds finally opened!
    2012-06-24_16-31-14_372.jpg

    Not Centautea after all. Looks like a plain ol' daisy!
     

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