Heritage tree, Styracaceae?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by waterboy, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. waterboy

    waterboy Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Vancouver Island
    Hi,
    We have uncovered a heritage tree of the Styracaceae family but can't ID it down from there. It was discovered tucked in under the re-gen forest that had reclaimed the old homestead site we have purchased 10 years ago. Homesteaded in the early 1900's, it was planted by an old hand dug well. It has serious heart rot but it is clearly a survivor so it gets to stay.
    Prolific flowers, very small, cream coloured petals not very showy like a few of the other known Styracaceae.
    Flowers scented but not overly fragrant.
    Total height 30-35 feet, spread 20ish.
    In the picture of the trunk there is a young root sucker beside to reference old and new
    Of note is the red colour at base of leaf stems
    Tree is located on Northern Vancouver Island in the Port Hardy area
     

    Attached Files:

  2. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

    Messages:
    6,362
    Likes Received:
    240
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    The nectaries on the leaf petioles would indicate Prunus (Rosaceae). I'm not very good at distinguishing bird cherries, would guess Prunus serotina from the tree shape. Maybe that species could be in bloom now - I have photos from one year of buds at the end of May.
     
  3. waterboy

    waterboy Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Vancouver Island
    Thank You Wendy,

    I believe you got it! I had no idea Prunus could flower in racemes. It certainly has me doing more research. When you say "nectaries on the leaf petioles" what is the structure you are looking at?
    Again, Thank You, This property is always surprising us with the various plantings that have held on or naturalized from century ago.
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

    Messages:
    6,362
    Likes Received:
    240
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    The Prunus avium - Wikipedia page has a photo on the left side of the page, under Description and Ecology.
    Ants on a Cherry Tree - ANTfinity describes the interest that ants have on these, again on Prunus avium, but all cherries have them, as do some other trees. Here is a page that lists several other species that have them, many not even in the Rosaceae family: Ants and Extra-floral Nectaries.

    Cherries always flower in some sort of inflorescence. The ornamental ones usually flower in umbels or corymbs; most of the ones we call bird cherries flower in racemes. Plums usually have single flowers.
     

Share This Page