Flowers in Park

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by David Tang, May 8, 2019.

  1. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    Shot in McLennan Park in Richmond, BC.
    Unfortunately, neither has a label around.
    Many thanks for their IDs.
     

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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Is the first one a vine? Some people can tell what things are just from the flowers, but for others of us, it really helps to photograph and post the whole plant as well as the flowers. I know you're used to posting fungi; for flowers, it helps to also show the plant or tree habit and the leaves and the fruits and the stems or bark - whatever you can.
    If a vine, then Clematis montana.

    The second is Camassia. I don't know how to distinguish the species, though UBCBG has tried to teach me - you can check out these Botany Photo of the Day:
    Camassia cusickii | Botany Photo of the Day
    Camassia quamash subsp. walpolei | Botany Photo of the Day
    Camassia quamash | Botany Photo of the Day
    Camassia quamash | Botany Photo of the Day
     
  3. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    Thanks for your speedy reply and suggestion.
    Yes, I used to shoot birds. But today's still windy and
    not much birds around. So need to shoot plants with
    500mm tele lens, hence the "flower only" photos.
    I remember the 4 petals flowers are grouped around
    the base of a trunk, but didn't investigate from a distance
    of 10 feet away ! May be they are on a vine.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Clematis montana and Camassia leichtlinii.
     
    Daniel Mosquin likes this.
  5. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thanks, Ron B. So happy to see you back!
    Daniel Mosquin linked a few years ago to an article that mentioned that on this species, the tepals twist together to cover the ovary after flowering. It looks like that's starting to happen at the bottom right of the posted photo, shown clearly at Great Camas, Large Camas, Leichtlin's Camas, Suksdorf's Large Camas: Camassia leichtlinii ssp. suksdorfii (Synonyms: Camassia leichtlinii var. suksdorfii, Camassia suksdorfii).
    It also mentions that on this species, the tepals are all the same size and shape, wheras on Camassia quamash, the tepals "are slightly irregular with the lower tepal often curved outwards from the stem. The tepals wither separately and do not cover the ovary."

    I'm ready to go try my new knowledge now - Camassia are opening at the UBCBG Garry Oak Meadow. I still don't know what about C. cusickii, other than pulling up the bulbs to see if they're slimy.

    Hey, @David Tang, thanks for posting this!
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    C. cusickii splits off immediately by having 10 or more large leaves per bulb. Also the flowers are a distinctively light blue.
     
  7. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thanks! I'm all set then.
     
  8. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    Most thankful for all of you.
     

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