First attempt at identification (part 5)

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by nibs9, Sep 1, 2011.

  1. nibs9

    nibs9 Member

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    ok last thread of the series!

    batch 5:

    row 1
    #1. Common Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)
    #2. unknown?
    #3. Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)
    #4. Purple-Flowering Raspberry (Rubus odoratus)
    #5. Musk Mallow (Malva moschata)
    row 2
    #6. Pale Purple Coneflower (Echinacea pallida) - is this the widely marketed echinacea plant people use to prevent colds?
    #7. unknown?
    #8. Thin-leaved Coneflower (Rudbeckia triloba)
    #9. Fragrant Water-lily (Nymphaea odorata) (hard to tell without flowers, but seemed the only flower with large and circular lilypads)
    #10. Spearmint (Mentha spicata)
    row 3
    #11. Goldenrod (my god there are at least 30 species of goldenrod that all look nearly identical. how do you identify these beasts?)
    #12. Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
    #13. Common Plantain (Plantago major)
    #14. Common Evening-Primrose (Oenothera biennis)
    #15. Creeping Bellflower (Campanula rapunculoides)

    That's the last of it. Thankyou very much to all who can help. -nibs
     

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  2. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Row 1
    #1 Don't know about the weed in front, but Eastern White Pine Pinus strobus behind.

    Row 2
    #9 also compare White Water-lily Nymphaea alba.

    Row 3
    #12 yes, Yarrow Achillea millefolium.
    #13 Greater Plantain Plantago major.
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I'll confirm #6 as Echinacea, but with dried up petals being what they are I wouldn't try for a species designation. It could just as easily be the bleached-out flowerhead of E. purpurea, and the determination would be very difficult without seeing a fresh flower. In answer to your other question, it's E. purpurea that's normally used medicinally.

    #7 is a Geum of some sort; without seeing the leaves it will be tough to say which. G. macrophyllum is a reasonable culprit.
     

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