Blue-flowered shade-tolerant plant

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Ken R, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. Ken R

    Ken R Active Member

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    This low-growing plant is in a bed with woodland shade lovers like native ginger-root and jack-in-the-pulpit. The plant is in bloom now.

    Can you name it?
     

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  2. pierrot

    pierrot Active Member 10 Years

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    Hello KenR

    Anemone nemorosa?
    or at least an anemone commonly a wood anemone
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Agree it is an Anemone, but not A. nemorosa, the leaf shape isn't quite right, and the flowers of A. nemorosa are pure white or slightly pink-tinged.
     
  4. tipularia

    tipularia Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  5. Ken R

    Ken R Active Member

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    Thanks, Pierrot, Michael, and Tipularia.

    Last year I did a kind of archeological dig and recovered many, many faded or broken plant tags that the previous owner had left scattered about the garden. Consulting the records of that effort, I find that one of the tags recovered from the bed in question was "Anemone nemorosa allenii".

    A clump of the anemone (not pictured) is growing up through a smaller clump of Asarum splendens (aka Hexastylis splendens). I wonder which plant was there first. I'm inclined to trim the anemone back. Any thoughts?
     
  6. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I've been tenderly nurturing a few sprigs of A. Robinsoniana for several years and was astonished to see it running rampant in the flowerbed of an acquaintance recently. It's not a timid plant if it likes your conditions, and thus you needn't be timid about dealing with it. Trimming might not be the word you want though. You can dig, and see if it's spreading by roots or seeding itself to separate plants. However, in the case of Robinsoniana, it goes dormant later in the season, and so won't bother your planting scheme for long.
     
  7. Ken R

    Ken R Active Member

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    Thanks, Karin.
     

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