Tree with variegated pinnately compound leaves, wavy leaflet edges

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by wcutler, Aug 4, 2010.

  1. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I think the variegation in the leaflet colouring is part of the natural appearance of this tree, but maybe it's throwing me off. It's had this colouring since I first noticed the tree in April (I think I noticed it then). The leaves seem to have 11-13 leaflets, all with wavy edges. The leaf arrangement seems alternate. I don't remember seeing flowers and I don't see any fruits.
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  2. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

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    Last edited: Aug 5, 2010
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Agree, Koelreuteria paniculata. The pale flecking and lack of flowers is probably climate-related; it doesn't like cool oceanic climate summers, needing hot continental summers to grow well. The one or two I've seen in my area are very similar, but ones I've seen in places with hot summers, it has all-green leaves, grows much faster and larger, and flowers profusely.
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thank you both. I see there are cultivars of Koelreuteria paniculata called 'September' and 'September Gold' that bloom late August and September, so maybe this is one of those. I'll have to keep checking it out.

    I originally thought it a co-incidence that yesterday I figured out the identity of Aesculus parviflora, Bottlebrush Buckeye, which is also in the Sapindaceae family, but I see that maples are also in that family, so not so rare, though the Stanley Park guide I'm using shows only this tree in that family and only two specimens. It says Acer are in the Aceraceae family, but they seem to have been moved into Sapindaceae recently. My Aesculus is in the park but not in the book; it may have been planted too recently.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Similarly variegated Koelreuteria paniculata seedlings are frequent in seedling batches. Quercus robur and Styphnolobium japonicum also give variegated seedlings, as do various maples. But specimen shown is probably unusual for having remained variegated to this size - assuming it has been variegated from the start.
     
  6. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    We had a fairly warm dry summer, and this tree is totally green, not a variegated tree at all. I was going to note that I still had never seen flowers (well, that part is true) but when I went around to the other side for a photo, I noticed several fruits. It's not covered with fruits like the one on the plaza at UBCBG, but there they are.
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