Yucca Tree

Discussion in 'Soils, Fertilizers and Composting' started by Unregistered, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Yucca Tree and baking soda

    I also have a Yucca tree from California. My problem is, I have a cat. My tree's were just great before he got into it. He used it for a litter box. I read somewhere to mix a little backing soda in water and pour it in. Well my boyfriend put the whole box in with it. I won't be able to transplant until summer now. The plant consists of 3 trees. They have minimal leaves now. I put in some new dirt with the esisting dirt and put some food in with it. I am just sick about it since my mom brought them home on her lap from California. I lost her a couple years ago, due to cancer and I have no one to ask what to do about this. Please help!!!
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I'd go ahead and dump the whole works out, repot in fresh soil. If the baking soda killed all the leaves off, that's pretty dramatic--maybe the plants are nearly dead. You can find out by barerooting them, looking at the roots. Additional attentions from cats easily prevented by mulching pots with a reasonably thick layer of cobbles, cats like sandy dry soil to dig in rather than rocks.
     
  3. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Ron B has some very good suggestions. As well, keep watering down to a minimum during this time of year, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. These are fairly tough plants and as long as you're giving it plenty of sunlight. Maybe even a few thorny plants (cacti etc) planted at the base of the Yucca may prove enough for your cat.
     
  4. S.S

    S.S Member

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    I am assuming that you have Yucca elephantipes. If you find that the lower trunk has rotted, on a single trunk, it may be best to cut back to fresh wood and replant the top keeping soil moist but not wet until roots develop. I have found that if you have shoots on the trunk and the plant happens to start dieing, removing the shoots and replanting them works quicker and more reliably than doing a trunk cutting. Often when the plant is stressed the shoots will have little aerial roots forming as they try to save themselves. Definitely less water in colder months especially in colder regions. Also if your plant is being grown in a pot be sure to give regular fertilizing while growing to keep it healthy.
     

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