You don't have to speak Polish to enjoy the photos at this site!

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by KarinL, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,058
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Vancouver
  2. jaro_in_montreal

    jaro_in_montreal Active Member

    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    S-W Quebec
  3. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,771
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Fraser Valley, B.C. ,Canada
    Yes interesting, thanks Karin. Thought the Microbiota decussata 'Sylwek' interesting. Would be nice to see some different cultivars of that species available locally. Maybe Dax or others will have some cultivar pics, when time allows. And nice pic of the Abies procera 'Argentea' and, and, and, ..... thinking a ''conifer addiction" might be harder to resist than other plant addictions.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2007
  4. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Yes, tell us about it. GWorks Lougheed just got in a new bunch from some Northwest Garden Show - lots of goodies .....and we didn't buy them all !!!
     
  5. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,771
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Fraser Valley, B.C. ,Canada
    LOL. Thanks for that, maybe will get a chance to get or look at some dwarf firs or...., just need one more.... and thanks for leaving a couple. Have fun planting, good weather now.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2007
  6. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,058
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Vancouver
    I just got a Microbiota 'Gold Spot' in a Tiny Treasures pot - will post a photo one of these days, not that there's much to it yet. But those Tiny Treasures seem to turn up everywhere - keep your eyes open!

    Jaro, I'm glad you caught a few of Jan's plants in there - not surprised to hear the two are in contact. Some of the best shots in the list are of the garden behind the plant in question - unbelievable, manna. Chimera, addicted, yes!
     
  7. jaro_in_montreal

    jaro_in_montreal Active Member

    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    S-W Quebec
    I'm just keeping an eye out for progress, in terms of how Jan's plants spread across Europe -- hopefully they'll make the jump across the big pond, to N. America, in not too many years....

    With the existing import paperwork, it doesn't look practical for non-commercial individuals to import plants from European countries....
     
  8. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,771
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Fraser Valley, B.C. ,Canada
    Couldn't find much info on that one, sounds like growth habit normal. The more common one can get quite wide in fertile soil though, see it over 20' W in 12-15 years if not pruned. Your plant sounds interesting and we'll look forward to and appreciate a pic, maybe a closeup. Thanks there Karin, and will keep an eye open.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2007
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,758
    Likes Received:
    175
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    A good thing in my opinion (and to be applied to commercial companies, too) - there's already far too many blister rusts, sudden oak deaths, emerald ash borers, chestnut blights, elm diseases, . . . don't want yet more globetrotting nasties! I'm all in favour of restricting plant transfer to just seeds.
     
  10. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,382
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    Southwest France
    Wishful thinking Michael ;-)).
    It is true that Custom agents at airports in Europe seem to pretty much at the lookout, but if you have time to go to Algeciras or to the Turkish/EU border you will understand that anything can be brought into the EU from Africa and Asia respectively.

    Gomero
     
  11. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,758
    Likes Received:
    175
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Hi Gomero,

    Point taken, though fortunately, it isn't too much of a problem - few tropical African pests will do much trouble in temperate Europe (and there's not many importers willing to drive across the Sahara!); and beyond Turkey . . . how many people are going to try crossing Iraq?!?
     
  12. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,382
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    Southwest France
    Michael,

    I agree on the tropical pests but think about the flora of Morocco/Algeria and Turkey. They are not so different from European flora. And now think again about phytosanitary controls and safeguards in those countries. I think there is enough to be worried.
    I find incoherent the huge problems and complexities the EU places when importing plants from North America and Japan, areas with much more trustable controls, as compared with the regions above mentioned. Must probably be a bit of ‘political correctedness’ which rules all decisions taken in Brussels.

    Gomero
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,758
    Likes Received:
    175
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
  14. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,382
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    Southwest France
    Having Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and others as EPPO members is not that reassuring. They have Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran, China nearby and any pests present in those countries could easily arrive to them without human assistance, and, from there, to the EU.

    Gomero
     
  15. jaro_in_montreal

    jaro_in_montreal Active Member

    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    S-W Quebec
    This would seem to support Gomero's argument:

    Also, prior to the last ice age, the Siberian-Alaskan land bridge would have afforded easy transfer of pathogens, just as it did early American Indians and other mammals.

    PS. there have been suggestions of building a man-made bridge from Siberia to Alaska, to boost Asian-American trade -- similar to the Chunnel Tunnel in Europe....
     

Share This Page