Yolk grafts on maples

Discussion in 'Maples' started by zfrittz, Feb 26, 2020.

  1. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    Hello, I am new to the forum and I use the google translator to communicate with you, so I apologize for the things I can write and do not understand me well.

    I wanted to comment that I have been cultivating maples for over 40 years and although, for various reasons, I have not cultivated in 10 years, now I have returned.

    After this introduction, I am surprised that nobody uses the yolk graft in the maples.

    The yolk graft is very easy and the success rate is 100%, while the graft that I have seen in all the forum posts, is the cutter graft, whose percentage in the best case does not exceed 80% of success.

    That is why I ask those who are dedicated to the cultivation and reproduction of maple;
    Why do they do so?

    Greetings
     
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  2. kgeezy20

    kgeezy20 Active Member Maple Society

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    I’m new to grafting maples, only done it two seasons so it comes as no surprise that I’ve never heard of the “yolk graft”. I can’t seem to find anything about it online either. Would you care to explain it some? It sounds interesting.
     
  3. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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  4. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    Hi,
    I clarify that yolk is bud.

    The advantages are, that the success rate is 100%, when I worked making grafts, we made about 2000 to 2500 daily and the failures could be 4 or 5 in total and not because the graft failed, but rather because it was not right bundled with the graft tape, being the whole day grafting as fast as we could.

    The next advantage is that there is no bulge in the graft area, so that the graft marks after the first year are not appreciated, being practically impossible to know if there is any graft.

    Also, when done, it can remain in full sun, without the need to wrap the graft in a bag, or in any type of greenhouse.
    As it is not inside a bag, there are no fungi due to excess moisture, and the graft being around the whole diameter of the rootstock, there is no possibility of detachment.

    In the following photographs I put the whole process.

    The material used is not the most suitable, it comes from an olive branch, and although it is not the most suitable time I think it will be perfectly understood.
     

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  5. dicky5ash

    dicky5ash Active Member

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  6. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    sketch
     

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  7. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    Sorry, English is my 3rd language, but even to me this site looks like a poorly auto translated text from Spanish. The source of this site is bunch of Spanish Youtube videos. These pictures there have Spanish texts. I see no difference between the "Yema graft" aka "Yolk craft" and typical bud crafting method.
     
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  8. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    Graft names may also vary from one region to another.
     
  9. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    Last edited: Feb 28, 2020
  10. dicky5ash

    dicky5ash Active Member

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    The text in the article reads quite clearly to me.. not a terribly technically focused article admittedly! The reason for posting this link was purely as it referred to a yolk graft. I will be trying my hand on some grafting this year..so just to be clear do you think there’s a great chance of success if you take a tube of cambium/bark with a bud or the start of a new shoot included, rather than inserting a graft in T cut in the rootstock?

    When is the best time of year for me to try my hand?
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2020
  11. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    If done as seen in the published photos, it is the type of graft that has fewer errors.

    I advise you to have both buds and completely surround the rootstock, so you have to choose the right size to do it.

    The rootstock can be only 1.5 mm. with which a graft can be made in very small branches.

    Another detail is that the graft must match in length.

    The rootstock should not be cut until the graft sprouts.

    Do not use graft paste, just wrap it with plastic graft tape, without covering the 2 buds, only the cuts above and below.

    The most appropriate time is when the new shoots harden a bit to detach the bark with the buds, that will occur between mid-spring until late summer.
    In my area it would be the months from May to September.

    The best time is in May, so that the graft has time to sprout and grow, before winter.
    If it is grafted in September or October, it will not sprout until next year.
    Another possibility is to cut branches in January and store them in the refrigerator at about 3 or 5 degrees Fahrenheit, and graft in March
    The graft tape is removed when you have a couple of sheets.

    Ask if you have any questions.
     
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  12. dicky5ash

    dicky5ash Active Member

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    Thanks i’ll try it for sure.

    Cheers
    Rich
     
  13. dicky5ash

    dicky5ash Active Member

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    Not a grafting question but when is the best time to cut off a native branch that is growing from the rootstock?
     
  14. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    It is much easier than the cutter graft, and does not require any care afterwards, except cutting the tape when it sprouts, and it can be in the sun without any care.
    When I have material to graft I will put pictures of how I do it.
    But that is very easy. Just look at the olive tree photos

    When the graft has sprouted
     
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  15. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    When you do, show us how you did it, in case you make a mistake.
     
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  16. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    Of course, but as there is no English sites mentioning yolk graft, therefore this name is most likely a translation error.
     
  17. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    I think that the best thing would be to call it a ring graft, because it is a bark ring with a pair of buds that is grafted into the rootstock. ☺☺
     
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  18. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    It seems, that this is called Ring or Annular Budding, or Flute budding.
    See Fig 13.
    Budding Techniques
     
  19. zfrittz

    zfrittz Active Member

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    Ok.☺
     

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