Yew Tree

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by bjmsl, Aug 14, 2007.

  1. bjmsl

    bjmsl Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
    I am not sure if this is the right place to post my question but I figure this is the site to find out information about trees of all kinds.
    I have an intrest in yew trees. They have fasinated me for years but recently I have this want to have my own. My brother died about a week ago and I would like to plant a yew tree for him.
    i know very little about the care of the yew tree. Can you buy a yew tree in the USA? What is the difference between a Japanise Yew and the yew i see in grave yards and parks? Is there a yew bush and is it related to the tree? Would I need a male & female to keep my tree healthy?
    How do you care for sush a tree is you can buy one?
    See full of questions. Can anyone help?
    Thanks,
    bjmsl
     
  2. smivies

    smivies Active Member

    Messages:
    793
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    There are three species that you can easily grow in Ohio, Taxus baccata (European Yew), T. cuspidata (Japanese Yew), and T. canadensis (Canada Yew). The first two will grow into a small tree (depending on variety) and there is a popular cross between the two (T. x media) that also will grow into a small tree. Canada Yew is a spreading shrub best grown in a shady forest location.

    Most of the Yews you see in cultivation have been clipped into meatballs and sausages but left alone, most will get to 20' tall. Some are more spreading, others columnar, some with gold/yellow foliage. The best named varieties for Ohio are derived from T. cuspidata and T. x media (T. baccata doesn't really like hot summers). Lots of named varieties to choose from!
     
  3. bjmsl

    bjmsl Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
    Thank you so much for the information. The one I was thinking of is all twisted and the lower branches seem to root themselves when the get odler. Am i even on the right track? If so where can i find one?
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,759
    Likes Received:
    177
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    I'd not consider European Yew as reliably hardy in Ohio. It can get bad freeze damage in zone 7. Japanese Yew is much hardier, as is the hybrid between European and Japanese Yews (Taxus × media).
     

Share This Page