Would this work?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by maplesandpaws, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. maplesandpaws

    maplesandpaws Active Member

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    I have about 15 1-3yr grafted maples that are currently in individual pots; I've done this for several reasons, one of which is that they are simply too small for me to feel confident they can withstand the extreme weather we can get here in Kansas. But, I know they will grow faster - and, likely, do better overall - if they were planted in the ground. So, I have been wondering if something like the Gronomics elevated gardens or larger planter boxes might be a good compromise (www.gronomics.com). Depending on the size of the garden/box, I would plant several maples in each.

    I would love to hear thoughts and opinions on this, and why it may or may not be better than having them all potted individually.
     
  2. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    Hi M&P
    In theory,it's entirely possible to provide plants with better growing conditions when young in containers.The advantages of in-ground plantings soon become apparent though because we are often unwilling and ultimately unable to maintain containers at this level.It takes a lot of work and becomes increasingly unviable as they get bigger.
    The only advantage I can see in the planters you suggest would be perhaps a delay in the need for rootpruning,after all they are still containers and thus subject to the same maintenance and restrictions.
    I can see where you're coming from though,but to 'imitate' in-ground planting,I would imagine you'd need a pretty big and deep bed to enable use of a real soil that maintains it's structure and qualities, and may have to be 'connected' to your native soil for drainage reasons as in a raised bed.
    I'd love to plant some maples in this way in my front yard which is concrete,but I think drainage will be a big problem.
     
  3. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    The problem with those containers is that the roots are elevated and exposed to extremes in temperatures. Not good.

    Why not just plant them in the garden? I plant all my maples in raised beds and they do very well. I've planted 1 year old grafts and they have taken off without any special care. You could try it with a few and see how they do.
     
  4. maplesandpaws

    maplesandpaws Active Member

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    Very good point, something I hadn't considered... Though, if I did go this route, the raised garden/planters would be brought into the garage, etc, for the winter. Still, it's awkward enough moving some of my slightly larger pots, unless the raised garden was on wheels, it would likely be too heavy to move (easily, anyway).

    Not in the garden - yet - because our house is on the market, and there's no way I'm leaving any of my babies behind. Have two very rambunctious dogs (Siberian Husky and Belgian Shepherd) that need to be kept away from the trees lest they assist me in pruning, watering and repotting. And finally, we get some pretty nasty storms; just over a year ago, we had hail the size of softballs coming down for 20 minutes straight - no way the small trees could have come through that easily. Plus, I'm hoping to train several as bonsai; it'll be a process over many years since they are so young, but a few of them already show promise in their natural branch shape and structure.
     

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