Wonderfully good children's book on winter tree ID.

Discussion in 'Conversations Forum' started by togata57, Dec 28, 2008.

  1. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    I have just read an outstanding book, and would like to recommend it to you all.

    Winter Trees, by Carole Gerber, illustrated by Leslie Evans.
    Charlesbridge Publishing Co., 2008.
    ISBN: 978-1-58089-168-4

    In this beautifully illustrated work, a boy and his dog walk through a snowy woods, stopping to enjoy and identify the trees they encounter. These include sugar maple, American beech, paper birch, yellow poplar, bur oak, Eastern hemlock, and white spruce. The pleasantly rhymed text would be excellent to read aloud with a child: the lovely, colorful illustrations (linoleum block) clearly and simply show the shape and characteristics of these trees in their winter garb.

    I like this book for several reasons---most of all for its idea, i.e., that there is much beauty in nature if we take the time to see it.

    A great book for people of every age!
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Focused on trees of northeastern North America?
     
  3. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    One must start somewhere.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Oh, it wasn't a poke at it -- was just confirming ;-)
     
  5. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Given the dendrous cast of characters and the fact that the publisher is located in Watertown, Massachusetts, I'd say yes. I'll go OUT ON A LIMB and assert this, even.

    A sans-parentheses parenthetical note: I was cheered to learn that Carole Gerber resides in Powell, Ohio---she is both a fellow Buckeye and a neighbor. As Mike Myers used to say whilst performing the character of Wayne on SNL: "Excellent!"
     
  6. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Just checked my library data bases. Widley available in US public libraries. Also seems to be an Aust. publisher available

    Hope you all had a safe and happy Christmas and not too much snow damage. We are heading for a cool summer so far. Have been out of the loop for a good month with work. Finaly I get some me time and for the garden and the list. So see you all in the New Year.

    Liz
     
  7. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Daniel: I apologize for my inadvertent obfuscation. In the main paragraph of my original post, "These comprise" would have been clear and exact, and is what I should have written instead of "These include". I have been fined by the Verb Police, sentence reduced to time served.

    It would be great if this author would do more books, each on a different area. Saguaro cacti...redwoods...magnolias...the visual possibilites are vast, and pleasing to contemplate.

    This book neither talks down to the reader, nor overwhelms with too much information. As Goldilocks said, it is just right.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    That outcome always depends on who "the reader" is.
     
  9. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    My review of this book is, of course, my own opinion. While each of us can speak only from our own unique point of view, I presume to think that the qualities I find admirable in a book may appeal to other folks as well. Having encountered a book of worth and beauty, I chose to share my discovery with those I theorized might enjoy it. I welcome commentary from other readers.
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    What are some of the rhymes?
     
  11. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    "Trees that once had leaves are bare.
    They're dressed instead in lacy white.
    Snow dusts their trunks
    and coats their limbs
    with flakes that outline them with light.

    They stand distinct as skeletons,
    we clearly see the form of each:
    the egg shape of the maple tree;
    the taller oval of the beech...
    The V formation of the birch;
    the yellow poplar, wide and high;
    the spreading structure of the oak,
    its branches reaching toward the sky."

    "The beech tree called American
    has bark that's smooth and silver-gray.
    Tan leaves still cling to limbs and branches
    on this cold, bright winter day."

    The illustrations make this book for me. Each tree is given a 2-pp. spread, showing simple but accurate detail of bark, needles, cones, etc. In the best of all possible worlds, this would be the book to read with the grandkids by the fire, followed by an invigorating walk through the woods to see the trees just read about. If I ever DO have g.k.s, to hear one of them shout out "Look! There's a white spruce!" would bring a tear to my eye. Perhaps by the simple act of showing them this book, I could---metaphorically AND for real---"plant a seed" that might just germinate in later years into an awareness of and interest in the world around them. Hey! Why not dream big?
     

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