will cuttings grow?

Discussion in 'Magnoliaceae' started by luckimoose, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. luckimoose

    luckimoose Member

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    Hello,

    We have a large magnolia tree in our backyard here in Columbus, OH. The tree was brought here as a baby from Alabama about 15-20 ago, and seems to be doing well (lots of new growth). We're planning to move to the Northwest in the next year. The tree is too big to move, but is it possible to take a cutting with us so that I can plant it in our new home? Also, the tree is large and healthy, but has never bloomed. Any ideas why not?

    Thanks,
    Hilary
     
  2. jetoney

    jetoney Active Member

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    Here is an excerpt from Magnolias (1993) by Gary Knox from the University of Florida IFAS Extension web site http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG270

    "Cutting propagation is preferred for most magnolias. However, rooting potential of cuttings varies considerably among cultivars as well as among species. Magnolia denudata, M. acuminata, and M. grandiflora are considered difficult to root from cuttings.
    Soft to semi-hardwood cuttings should be taken from juvenile plants whenever possible. Wounding may be beneficial. Cuttings should be treated with 5,000 to 10,000 ppm IBA and placed under intermittent mist. Cuttings usually root within 6 to 12 weeks."

    There are some prior threads in this forum that discuss propagating magnolias as well.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 9, 2006
  3. luckimoose

    luckimoose Member

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    Great- thank you!
     
  4. Mir

    Mir Member

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  5. luckimoose

    luckimoose Member

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    This is so helpful- thank you for the detailed instructions! I will try it in the spring, when the ground is warmer.
     

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