Wild lilies Sunshine Coast

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwest Native Plants' started by Georgia Strait, Apr 1, 2020.

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  1. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    if anyone lives on the Sunshine Coast BC ... these are in fine bloom now

    A friend took these pix at Gospel Rock in Gibsons BC yesterday 31 March at a social distance

    They are gorgeous !

    Tho the sad part is how human litter (fr chip bags to beer cans) are scattered around the flowers

    I have also seen these at Smuggler Cove Provincial Marine Park in Halfmoon Bay BC (beyond Sechelt)

    What EXACTLY is LATIN name for these Lilies?

    And what is common name?

    (Édit to add 2 jpg)
     

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  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Beauty! Erythronium oregonum Those grow at UBCBG, but I have not seen them in the wild. Kind of limited range in BC.
     
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  3. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    These photos are at Gospel Rock which is the decades-long subdivisive subdivision acreage

    What is COMMON name? Dog tooth?
     
  4. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Or fawn lily?

    There is a pink version too???

    EDIT to add a couple of jpg from spring 2018 at Gospel Rock to show scale
    (No - this person was not picking the flowers ... just gently admiring)
     

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  5. Andrew Matheson

    Andrew Matheson Member

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    You can see some populations at lighthouse park. I believe people call them fawn lilies.
     
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  6. Andrew Matheson

    Andrew Matheson Member

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    The smaller pink species in this area is Erythronium revolutum, which I've personally only seen on Vancouver island.
     
  7. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Turner & Gustafson, Wildflowers of the Pacific Northwest (2006, Timber Press, Portland) have it that E. oregonum ranges to 16 in. tall and E. revolutum to 20 in. Assuming they are still up searching should turn up photos of a cemetery in Victoria that has lawns that are thick with E. oregonum in season.
     
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  9. Andrew Matheson

    Andrew Matheson Member

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    Interesting on the size! Shouldn't take any stock in common names eh.
     
  10. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Here's what they look like at St. Mary's Anglican Church on Salt Spring Island (last week of March, 2016)
     

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  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Shots of the cemetery population show sections where the Erythronium plants are really packed. However this view is so similar I now wonder if I remembered the location wrongly.
     
  12. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Daniel - it seems to me a few months ago someone fr Victoria was asking about moving this same plant fr their boulevard due to new house next door and contractors parking etc

    I will see if I can find the thread (way more fun than organizing income tax paperwork !)

    It would be interesting to know update
     
  13. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Erythroniums (E. oregonum and E. revolutum) are my favourite native flowers, both white and pink. Most people around here call them fawn lilies. Trout lily is the name more often used for Erythronium americanum which is not native to BC. Some areas where you can see (mostly the white fawn lilies) by the thousands on Vancouver Island are:
    * along Morrison Creek (runs parallel to the Englishman River off of Middlegate Road (photo attached)
    * Piper's Lagoon in Nanaimo
    * Puntledge River in Courtenay
    * Cowichan River (lots of pink fawn lilies - Erythronium revolutum.)
    * St. Peter Quamichan Churchyard in Duncan
    * St. Mary's Cemetery in Metchosin
     

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020
  14. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I haven't checked in years, but I saw a nice group of (possibly wild) E. oregonum alongside the old Black Mountain (Baden-Powell) trail above Lion's Bay, not far from the trailhead and parking lot that were obliterated by Hwy 99 construction around 2009. It's above the pullout on Hwy 99 just around the curve NW of the ferry exit ramp.
     
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  15. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    March 2022 UPDATE

    tough little plants along the side of the busy road — Gospel Rock

    ID = E-Flora BC Atlas Page

    with lots of footsteps and litter by humans at this beautiful spot created by glaciers - I believe it is private property (and pending condos) tho people stop all the time here for the view. (This is looking south toward Keats Isl and Bowen (Cape Roger Curtis) … on a clear day … all the way to WA State.

    @Willard perhaps you’ll have a chance to view if not already between scouting cherry blossoms (this is nr Franklin Road). Be very careful — wet moss and lichen is slippery and Gospel Rock is steep down to ocean.

    these are growing amidst moss, lichen, ferns (licorice fern?), grasses, a couple of volunteer apple trees (apple shrubs) plus some healthy and some dead Arbutus plus Douglas fir. And beverage containers and other unfortunate litter

    The small round flower is unknown to me — the white bloom was low to ground and approx size smaller than Cdn dime (maybe 3/8” diam)

    if anyone knows names of moss and lichens — I am curious.
     

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  16. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    At @Margot suggestion, i returned to same spot at Gospel Rock near Gibsons village and took another look at the small white round flowers

    i have attached a collage of photos of said plant

    i think it’s that very prolific weedy plant that I first saw in nursery containers (a ride-along plant that came home w me when buying shrubs I would guess 20 yr ago)

    i think I have asked about this plant on this (maybe outdoor PacNW) forum and I think @Ron B told us the name
     

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  17. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Of course! Everyone's first choice of most aggravating weed ever - Cardamine hirsuta, aka Snapweed, Pop weed, Hairy bittercress and, my favourite, &*%#. I saw it first in the 1970s, probably introduced in the soil of a plant I purchased. Before long everyone was talking about how difficult it was to eradicate. It blooms early and sets seed quickly; seed distribution is explosive and, I swear, every last one germinates, often in hard-to-reach places (like the middle of my cactus patch). Plants can produce seed even when they are only 1/4 inch tall.

    It is apparently fairly tasty as a member of the mustard family but my policy is to pull out every last one the moment I see it so as not to risk an ever bigger 'crop' the next year.

    There are some Cardamine species native to BC although C. hirsuta is not. It is possible that the plant in your photos is one of them, especially growing as it is in an area which doesn't seem to have many introduced plants - yet.
     
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