white substance

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by AHPULLINS, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. AHPULLINS

    AHPULLINS Member

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    my pigmy was planted a week ago and is turning yellow and has white substance on the leaves and not the trunk. I may be over watering it. I was told to water daily for the first week. (Even though its colder at night here in PHX AZ and the ground still looks quite wet)
     
  2. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    A pigmy...what? Could you post a picture? I'd guess, from your mention of wet and cold, some kinda fungus. Maybe mealy bugs.
     
  3. AHPULLINS

    AHPULLINS Member

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    I do apoligize. Its a pygmy date palm. I took it in today to a garden center and they said it was natural for it to have white where the new leaves grow. I looked at theirs and it had the same. So, I think I am satisfied with that answer. I dont think its mealbugs, its only been in the ground a week.

    My concern now is that it is yellowing and dying on the ends. I had been watering it everyday. I think that is too much here in Phx area of AZ. The weather is cooler and the ground is still wet. I just hope that I can save it. Ive stopped watering it and put some supertrive on it today. Gardening is so different here in AZ than it is in IL.
     
  4. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Holy cow! I bet it is. Yeah, I was surprised with the cold/wet thing when I read where you are---I think of Arizona as having 5% humidity, but I didn't want to jump to a conclusion. I realize that not ALL of the state is an arid desert!---So the white substance sounds like that white downy stuff on new growth, not a dense cottony gick that mealy bugs form. That's good! ---As for the yellowing, a certain amount of that could be adjustment to a new environment. Some of it could be normal aging. And yes, it could be moisture-related. You say that your palm was "planted", but then that you took it in to the garden center...? So is it in a pot, or in the ground?
     
  5. AHPULLINS

    AHPULLINS Member

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    It is planted. I type way too fast. I cut a little piece of the leaves to take it in.

    I noticed my mexican fan palm and Jacaranda tree are getting yellow leaves too. I never thought I could overwater outside plants. My plants in Illinois loved water. This soil is very sandy and clay-like.

    I would like to have a tropical backyard here in this desert. There are a few plants I could do, I just need to get this watering down. I often don't know how I would measure 24inches. I'm speaking of watering schedule charts. Do you know how much water would get 24" deep?
     
  6. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Given your dry conditions, I'd say A LOT of water. How do you mean..."sandy and clay-like"? Is your soil porous and well-draining, or (like mine here in Ohio) dense and hard? Is your problem too much water or too little? ...I'm thinking---why don't you try some of the gorgeous cacti and succulents and desert plants that are already adapted to grow in your conditions? Go ahead and give the tropical thing a try. If you really want palm trees, palm trees you shall have. As the saying goes: the impossible just takes a little longer. BUT: one thing I have learned from this forum is that there is an incredible variety of desert-suited plants, and they are beautiful, too. Just be patient...I'm sure that within a few hours you'll have replies from lots of forum members who will have all sorts of useful information and suggestions for you. ---You could post again with a title like: "Plant Suggestions for Arizona Garden?" and I KNOW you would get speedy and knowledgeable help. Ditto for the date palm---repost with a title that includes the name and our tropical-plant folks will be on it immediately. ---In any case, I wish you the best of botanical luck!
     
  7. AHPULLINS

    AHPULLINS Member

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    Tropical plants for Phx AZ

    Dense and very hard. Its strange tho, the place where the palm is planted is more soften, due to me digging tht area up several times before I planted the pygmy.

    Other parts of my yard I had to dig in two stages cuz the ground was hard as a rock. I poured water in the dug hole over night and believe it or not, but a lot of the water was still visible. The ground was so dense it hadn't evaporated into the soil.

    I hear u about the desert plants. If this fails I will try tht. My neigbors have a beautiful garden of bright colored tropicals, and I love it. I love color.
    Thanks for everythg. I know its late there in ohio.
     
  8. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    You astonish me! Like I said, I try to not assume things, but here I was assuming your soil would be wonderfully loose and draining like the soil seen on these gardening shows. Like a gently rolling sand dune, maybe. Good grief! Well, no wonder your plants are unhappy. Talk to your neighbors and see how they dealt with the situation---if their plants are thriving and blooming, obviously these folks are doing the right things.

    Yeah, boy, do I feel that rock-hard soil thing. Even after years of effort, my soil still is full of clay and could be used for building material. It's the big reason that I tend to grow native plants, ones that can handle these lousy conditions. ---Dig it up as deep as you can and mix in as much good stuff as you can. How to develop (or forever toast!) your deltoids, trapezius, and rotator cuff all in one not-easy lesson! ---Yet another subject on which this forum and its intrepid members can help you.

    Keep us posted on developments!
     
  9. mnunes86

    mnunes86 Member

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    hello, I seem to be having a similar issue. I have a windmill palm tree 15lbs potted inside here in the Boston, Ma area. I noticed today that some of the fronds where it folds has a white fuzzy cotton little balls on them. I also noticed that some of the tips were starting to get brown, but my guess is that its because there is new fronds coming in & its taking the nutients from those. Can you let me know what the fuzz is & if its harmful to the palm? If so how can I take care of it?

    Thanks
     
  10. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Picture is of Mealy Bug on stem of 'Clustered Parlour Palm' (Chamaedorea seifrizii ex-'Bamboo Palm').
    I'd say the Phoenix reobelinii 'Dwarf Date' has just got it's natural grey/white powder on it's fronds. If it's a fine dusty white then it's normal.
    The windmill palm however would be most likely the pest. They generally do not do large damage to established palms but can disfigure and ruin seedling and young stock.
    A systemic pesticide is a guaranteed method of removal, however to try avoid chemical use start with just spraying with hose (under pressure) or white oil or eco-oil is also an alternative user friendly product.
    The brown tipping occurs generally from over watering or under watering. If you have heavy clay soils that can also be a problem as it will retain too much moisture and not give the required drainage that palms love.
    Also fertilise your plants at least once a year in spring with a lawn or palm fertilser. Both are similar in nutrients and you'll find lawn is cheaper.
    I forgot to ask if it's the lower fronds yellowing (on pygmy palm), this is also natural to be happening. If your palms fresh growth were to be yellowing I'd check the amount of light it is and was getting before you bought it. It's been 4 weeks since your original post has your palm adapted yet?
     

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  11. mnunes86

    mnunes86 Member

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    thanks that helps a lot. The soil we bought was Miracle-Gro would any of the chemicals in that do any harm to it as well or is the cause to the fuzzing????

    If so what kind of potting soil would you recommend?

    I appreciate all your help.

    Thanks Again!
     
  12. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    If it's package mix it shouldn't be too bad. Some brands have different additives to improve water retention or extra nutrients but basically what you pay for is what you get. Any fresh mix that's well drained is best for palms and nearly all potted plants.
    If it's potted and you have a dish under it don't let the dish constantly hold water unless your palm is well rooted in the pot. Potting mix can get too wet at the bottom of a pot before roots have fully developed and take up the moisture in that area. This causes things like rot and bacterial / fungal soil problems to plants of most varieties especially indoors.
    Being indoors yours would be better off fertilised less quantity more often (every 8 weeks)
     
  13. mnunes86

    mnunes86 Member

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    Hi,

    I have done what you've suggested but it doesn't seem to have worked. I have two leaves that are dead & brown & the new ones coming in are drying up & curling in. What else can i do to stop it from dying?

    Thanks
     
  14. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Is there any chance of a photo?
    I wonder how cold has your winter been?, there's a good chance it has cold damage to the fronds if temps were low. The pest doesn't really affect mature plants negatively only very young seedlings.
     

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