When to move hardy fuchsias

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by TomG, Sep 21, 2020.

  1. TomG

    TomG Member

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    I would like to move two hardy fuchsias. I am uncertain when to move them.

    Obviously now is not the time to move them when they are in full bloom.

    Should I move them later this fall once the leaves and flowers have fallen off and they are going dormant?

    Or should I wait until early next spring when they are still dormant?

    Or should I wait until later in the spring when they start sending up new shoots that indicate they are in growth mode and will be able to rapidly reestablish themselves.
     
  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @TomG good evening Tom. I would wait until the blooms have finished and the leaves have dropped or started to drop. I used to grow hundreds and preferred to have some warmth in the ground to move them. In Spring I found the ground too cold.
    Do make sure the ones you have are hardy, as the delicate varieties don't move too well IMO.
    I would not move them when they are putting out new growth either.
    So timing is important as you don't want hard frosts when you do move your Fuschias. In the Autumn I have packed straw around the base after moving if frosts are forecast for added protection. It all depends on your location.
    Hope this is of help.,
     
  3. TomG

    TomG Member

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    Thanks for your advice. Like you I am in Zone 8b, so there should be enough time after the leave drop to move the hardy fuchsias.
     
  4. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I moved rooted stems from two varieties of hardy Fuchsias in the spring as soon as I could see signs of sprouting. The above ground stems had been killed by freezing weather, which is normal for my varieties. The transplanted stems did very well and are now sizable bushes. If you are moving the whole plants, transplanting in fall and protecting them from frost, as suggested by Acerholic, should work well.
     
  5. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Hello

    and how hardy?

    If you have the old Magellan then I say make cuttings in Vancouver BC versus moving plant

    I also have a Santa Claus which is supposed to be hardy in the coast climate (and I know it does well near Portland OR USA)

    But I have bought so many Santa Claus And left them out at coast and they expire in the big drop temp that seems to be USA thxgiving time or end of Feb snow these days

    So I now keep Santa in a container (maybe 2 gallon size) and bring it inside winter (garage w some daylight & av temp approx 50F) and maybe pour some water on it a few times then after frost season I put it outside with a bit of very low numbers food and off it goes again

    Cross fingers it works again this upcoming winter at coast - good reminder on chore list

    There is a good article about the so-called hardy fuchsias in one of those city lifestyle mags fr Portland — i will see if I can find it and post link

    Bottom line - my best success has always been the original old Magellan one sees in old neighbourhoods at coast.

    I think I might have posted link about the hardy fuchsias maybe a yr ago here so search for keyword
     
  6. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Georgia Strait, I have been growing Santa Claus, Double Otto, and one other large flowered hardy Fuchsia for over 30 years in Burnaby, and they have all survived in my back yard planted under a peach tree initially and then moved to a new cherry tree a few years ago. I admit that one winter, quite a few years ago, they barely survived unusually cold temperatures. After that, I've been protecting them with a mulch of prunings from my box hedge; and they grow 2 to 3 feet high from their bases each summer.
     
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  7. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Wow you are lucky to grow these!

    The coast garden i speak of is subject to sudden deep freeze outflow wind and cold temps off the ocean ... maybe you are more sheltered

    Thé hummingbirds love the Santa Claus blossoms ... I assume they get food fr them.

    I mingle some multi color annual coleus w Santa and it looks really nice together - photo below

    (We can make « Arp » rosemary plant live thru coast winter if we put its containers up against sheltered side of cabin house - we don’t mulch it because we do want to use some rosemary herb thru the winter)
     

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