Identification: What the heck is this?

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwest Native Plants' started by b00kish, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. b00kish

    b00kish Member

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    I've been watching this plant for a while, it finally started flowering today. It is not in 'Wildflowers of the pacific northwest'. Can anyone tell me what it is?
     

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  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Likely a Pyrola. Photo of the whole plant (including leaves, if any, at base) / indication of height?
     
  3. b00kish

    b00kish Member

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    Hi Daniel, there are no leaves visible at all, the plants are growing out of rock/scree on Gabriola Island. I'm not very good at estimating height - 6 to 8 inches? The aphids love them and I have to keep squishing them every time I go past.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2012
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Sometimes Pyrola are leafless.
     
  5. b00kish

    b00kish Member

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    Hi Daniel and Ron

    I have looked at some photos of pyrola on the internet and they certainly look very like the plant I am interested in. It was in the 'Wildflowers of the pacific northwest' book but I discounted it because it had leaves and is said to grow in bog/fen/wetland and the one I found is growing in a very hot dry location. Also, in my defense, the photo is not that great! I am a bit disappointed that the plant turned out to be wintergreen, I really dislike that smell!
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Not the same as Gaultheria procumbens, the source of oil of wintergreen.
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Wintergreen is the standard English name for Pyrola spp.; e.g.:
    Intermediate Wintergreen Pyrola media
    Common Wintergreen Pyrola minor
    Round-leaved Wintergreen Pyrola rotundifolia
    They're also the original source for oil of wintergreen.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Highly artificial "standard English names" situation you keep dragging up aside, Pyrola will still not be the plant providing the aromatic wintergreen berries likely to be the source of the displeasure indicated.
     

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