What plant does this come from ?

Discussion in 'Plants and Biodiversity Stumpers' started by ginger749, Mar 22, 2007.

  1. ginger749

    ginger749 Active Member

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    What type of plant is this ?
    I have blanked out the Flower ,
    A certain give away .

    DSCN8969.jpg
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Seen it before, but can't remember the name :-((
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Pteris?
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Pteris don't have flowers. Here is a wild guess. How about a coleus?
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I didn't catch the reference to a flower.
     
  6. ginger749

    ginger749 Active Member

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    Not coleus .
    It is more of a tree type plant .
    Flowers could be single or doubles .
    Red , Orange , Yellow , White & more .
    When I trimmed it down ,
    Main trunk was 3 inches in diameter .
     
  7. TonyR

    TonyR Active Member

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    Could it be some weird leaf mutation of a Hibiscus? Or even a leaf affected by mites, herbicide or a virus? There is a cultivar of H. tiliaceus with mutant foliage a bit like this.
     
  8. ginger749

    ginger749 Active Member

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    Tony. You are 100% right .
    This Hibiscus was becoming a bother .
    So I cut it down to the ground
    & poured RoundUp all over the stump.
    2 months later I got this .
    And no Turtles were affected in the process .

    DSCN8970.JPG
    DSCN8965.JPG
     
  9. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Interesting effect, now becoming increasingly known in rose growing down south because of the way the bizarre growth mimicks the Rose Rosette Disease.

    In fact, it was first described in Canada in 1940. The causal agent is unknown, but most likely a virus carried by airborne mites. It is an interesting disease because, on the one hand, farmers and landowners view it as a potential biological weapon for control of the invasive Rosa multiflora wild roses, but on the other hand, a scorch of nurseries and residential gardeners.
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The problem is that rose rosette was recently made hypervirulent so it would clear multiflora rose out of timber production areas. Nevermind the effect it could have on rose growing and the production of related plants like orchard fruits.
     

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