What kind of Palm is this?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by Hurricaner, Feb 17, 2007.

  1. Hurricaner

    Hurricaner Member

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    Hi,
    I'm new here and looking for some help. I live in Southern Utah and, due to a severe cold spell this year, many of the Palm trees in my area took a beating. However, one type seemed to weather the storm well and I'd like to plant a couple in my back yard. Can anyone tell me what type of Palm this is? Also, I'd appreciate any additional info you might be able to share about it. I'm looking for something that can take periodic colder temps, as well as our hot summers. Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hard to tell for sure with the small pic size, but the most likely (and the best choice to plant) is Trachycarpus fortunei (Chusan Palm, from China). This is the hardiest palm, taking temperatures down to below -20°C; some in Bulgaria are known to have survived -27°C without damage.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    It's a Washingtonia.
     
  4. Hurricaner

    Hurricaner Member

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    The trunk of this particular Palm is Pineapple shaped and quite large around the bottom. The approx. 10 year old tree is only about 10' tall and the trunk is about 2' in diameter. The homeowner I talked to thought it was a "Palmetto". When I took a picture to the nursery, they thought it was a California Fan Palm, which I'm sure is incorrect. Would the Washingtonia be slow growing tree with that type of trunk?
     
  5. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    It's definately a Washingtonia robusta (Mexican Fan Palm) but pehaps a hybrid with Washingtonia filifera (California Fan Palm) aka Washingtonia'filibusta'.
    It certainly has the look of a hybrid of the two species, but either way the genus is Washingtonia.

    Cheers, LPN.

    PS. Michael F - as a side note Trachycarpus fortunei is never or very rarely known in North America as "Chusan Palm". Common name here is Windmill palm. Thank goodness for botanical names.
     
  6. Hurricaner

    Hurricaner Member

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    Thanks for your help. Sounds like this Palm has the potential to get pretty tall. I'm not real sure I want to plant it in my backyard.
     
  7. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I thought it was planted, or at least it certainly looks to be in your photo? You don't like "tall" palms? ... they are trees.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  8. kv466

    kv466 Member

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    this is a sabal palm, for there are no spikes on the fronds it couldn't be a washingtonia...
     
  9. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The photo doesn't have enough definition or detail to show the thorns on the petioles. Sabal leaves are costa-palmate, Washingtonia leaves are not, which is clearly shown in the photo. Chestnut reddish brown bases on the trunk are characteristic of Washingtonia and evident in the photo. This palm is definately Washingtonia.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  10. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    I don't know whether anyone in your area sells pindo palms (Butia capitata), but these feather-leaf palms from Uruguay, southern Brasil, and vicinity are relatively hardy, likely to survive brief cold snaps down to nearly zero. Trachycarpus seems more of a wet-climate species, so it might like a sheltered spot with a relatively humid microclimate. Then there's Nannorrhops ritchiana, probably hard-to-get, but a species well adapted to low humidity and nighttime cold. And of course you shouldn't underestimate southern Utah's own beautiful native plants.
     
  11. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    "relatively hardy, likely to survive brief cold snaps down to nearly zero"

    I doubt Butia capitata could manage that severity ~ 0f (-18c). I have one that get's into trouble with temps below 12f for more than a couple of hours.

    Cheers, LPN.
     

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