what is the name of this tree?

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by wolfywuf, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. wolfywuf

    wolfywuf Member

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    It looks like water melon, but it is a lime. The lime diameter is about 2cm to 3cm.
    Can anyone tell me what this species is? Thank you.
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    The plant appears to be Centennial Kumquat. The variegation in the fruit fades as it ripens (there's a ripe fruit hidden behind some leaves in the photo).
     
  3. wolfywuf

    wolfywuf Member

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    Thank you… JungleKeeper.
    Where tat plant’s origin? What is the ideal soil and fertilizer for that funny free?
    As browse through the Internet, the fruits are mostly oval shape. But mine are all in round shape. Why it is like that? and the leaves are variegated green with a splash of white, however, mine are with splash of light yellow
     

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    Last edited: Aug 9, 2005
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Hi, wolfywuf. There's not much information out there on this plant but I would treat it like a Nagami Kumquat if I had one. It should feel right at home in your area. Cultural information for Fortunella is readily available on the web.

    Check out one citrus collector's information on this plant. If it is indeed an orangequat then that may explain the fruit's round shape. As you can see on the same page, not all kumquats are oval-shaped. The author also has a page on variegated citrus.
     
  5. wolfywuf

    wolfywuf Member

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    Thank you so much for the valuable information...
     
  6. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    How about a photo of the fruit sliced in half?
    I would like to see what the pulp inside looks
    like, preferably on ripe fruit.

    When you bought this tree was it called a Lime?
    If not, can you tell us why you feel this tree is a
    Lime? How long have you had it and do you know
    the sourcing of this tree, where did you get it and
    where did the person you got it from get it. Just
    because you are in Malaysia does not mean this
    tree originated from there.

    I think from your photos we are seeing the tale
    of two plants. One photo shows a trait that is
    close to being a Centennial Kumquat but another
    photo leads me to believe your tree might be
    something different.

    Jim
     
  7. wolfywuf

    wolfywuf Member

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    Hi Jim, Good day to you.

    The posted photo is taken in last year. Months ago, my plant was attacked by the insect/fungus (white color spot at branches and leaves. I am not sure what is the actual name, but our local ppl call that ‘white-fly’). The tree condition now is very poor…. many branches die up, leaves turn to yellowish and keep on falling, no fruiting. I am so sad because of that.

    The nursery ppl advised to fertilize with high % of N fertilizer and add in some insecticide. Since last week, it shows the evident of recovery… leaves turn greener, new leaves is forming and starts to have 1 or 2 fruit, but still very small size. Therefore, I am unable to slice it into half to post the photo. I will do that once the fruit size is big enuff.

    I tear of the fruit skin before, the pulp look like normal lime pulp. By that time, I don’t know how to call that plant. So I just simply called it ‘lime’. (In mandarin pronouns as “ Ji zhiâ€)

    I didn’t bought that tree; it is a gift from a relative of mine when I visited to her house about ten years ago. She bought that plant from Kuching (the capital city of Sarawak, Malaysia). The person who sold also doesn’t know where is the origin. That is why I posted the question in this forum to seek for the answer. I am curious about that too. Worst is, before JungleKeeper told me the actual name, I don’t even know how to call it properly, ahahahaha…..

    The ripe fruits are orange in color. The diameters are normally between 2 to 3cm (as you can see in the photo, there is a orange color fruit at back the green fruit). There is only one tree shows in the photo, as i only bring one from my home town.

    Beside the skin looks funny to me, it is weird about its seedling also. My mom and I have tried so many times to plant from the seedling, but all the times are not successful. The seedlings will die after it reaches 4 - 6cm heights. So far, if we want to have more trees, we will cut off the branch’s bark, then cover with soil by plastic beg around the cut-off area to let it grow root, after that cut the whole branch and transplant it in new pot. (I don’t know how to call that technique at your place; in here we call 'tut-transplanting').


    Regards,
    Wolfy
     
  8. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Wolfy:

    Look at this link sometime. Notice the
    coloring and shape of the leaves.

    http://www.crosscommonnursery.co.uk/plantshop_ext.asp?plid=877&ptid=36&_page=1&sL=

    There is also a variegated Limequat that I
    have seen of which the stripes will stay
    as the fruit is ripening. The Centennial
    Kumquat fruit will turn an orange in color
    but will lose the stripes as the fruit is ripe.
    The variegated Lemon (Eureka) I have will
    also keep the stripes as the fruit matures.

    We will have to see what your mature
    fruit looks like both the rind color as
    well as the color of the pulp to better
    know what you have. Junglekeeper
    may still be right on the name of this
    tree.

    So far, if we want to have more trees, we will
    cut off the branch’s bark, then cover with soil
    by plastic beg around the cut-off area to let it
    grow root, after that cut the whole branch and
    transplant it in new pot. (I don’t know how to
    call that technique at your place; in here we
    call 'tut-transplanting').


    We call this method of propagation air
    layering.

    Jim
     
  9. wolfywuf

    wolfywuf Member

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    Thank you Jim,

    I wish my fruit could mature faster for you to identify. At the moment, the whole tree (planted in pot) only has 2 fruits, which is still a tiny dot. The diameter not up to 2mm I think. Poor tree.

    What I notice is for the ripe fruit, stripes still can be seen, but not very clear. Skin quite thin and the pulp is light-orange color.

    I have scanned the damaged leaves, as per attached. I’ll try to borrow a digital camera to shoot the whole tree and post it later on.

    Regards,
    wolfy
     

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  10. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Then again, the plant may be a variegated Calamondin. Have a look at the photo on this page about half way down.
     
  11. wolfywuf

    wolfywuf Member

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    Good day to you Junglekeeper,

    Thank you so much for the hyperlink. The webpage is very useful to me.

    Regards,
    wolfy
     

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