Wanted to select new tree

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Creatrix, May 6, 2019.

  1. Creatrix

    Creatrix Active Member

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    Hello Folks
    I had to remove a very old Bing Cherry tree (very sad) due to disease: I am having the stump ground out and would like to know if I could replant that space with a new tree.
    Do I amend the area? I do not know what this will look like as I have never had a tree taken down before.
    I live in Alberni Valley on Vancouver Island, Zone 7a (I think) and we experience some very hot spells in July and strong winds in late fall.
    I would love some deciduous tree, no fruit trees and there are no height restrictions. I need to create a privacy screen as it is on the street side.
    thanks

    does anyone have any recommendations regarding type of tree to plant into this space? I am considering Dogwood or Ginko. Txs. Again.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2019
  2. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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    Ginkgos are tall and open for a long time, years and years. It would be unwise to replace a tree that died with the same thing, so stay away from Prunus. Dogwoods, Cornus kousa or contraversa, but not florida, are good for low branching or clumps. Paperbark Maple is as pretty in winter as it is in summer because it has great pealing bark for close-up viewing . Stewartia pseudocamellia also has interesting pealing bark and white flowers in mid-summer.
     
  3. Creatrix

    Creatrix Active Member

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    thank you very much... now to find a Latin dictionary! Cheers!
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    If you want to try a dogwood, go for your local native Pacific Dogwood Cornus nuttallii, it's better adapted to your climate.
     
  5. Creatrix

    Creatrix Active Member

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    Cheers
     
  6. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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    After a lot of research I planted a Malus transitoria 'Golden Raindrops' last year in a similar situation to what you describe. Already I am thrilled with it. See: View Plant | Great Plant Picks

    As for dogwoods (Cornus species): Our native Cornus nuttallii can be quite problematic grown as a specimen . . . although it can grow in full sun, it is susceptible to sunburn and sun scald. It thrives in local woods where its thin bark is protected by other shrubs. Fungal diseases can (and often do) disfigure the leaves.

    For these reasons, I think both Cornus mas and Cornus kousa would be better choices if you want a dogwood. (Cornus mas is also called Cornelian cherry but it is not a cherry - Prunus sp. - but its flowers don't look like typical dogwood flowers.)

    Cornus controversa is very beautiful but very slow growing.

    By the way, you don't need a Latin dictionary - just Google any of the botanical names and you'll find lots of information online.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yes, Cornus nuttallii will be apt to have leaf and twig problems anywhere there is enough ozone in the atmosphere.
     
  8. Partelow

    Partelow Active Member

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    If you would like a dogwood let me suggest “Eddies White Wonder” which is a hybrid of the eastern and western dogwoods. It is reputed to be resistant to the problems our native western dogwoods are prone to. I have one here in the southern interior of B.C. and it has been “bullet proof”. An incredibly reliable performer. As I grew up in the Alberni Valley I recall many lovely trees well adapted to its unique climate. Horse Chestnuts, English Oaks, Norway Maples. Depending on your site, you might succeed with native arbutus or Garry Oak. Both of the latter are adapted to summer drought and must not be watered much .
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Actually Garry oak occurs in wetlands with Oregon ash as well as on dry rocky sites - what it needs more than good drainage is to not be shaded out by competing trees like Arbutus menziesii. The largest measured examples in western WA are down near the Columbia River, where they grow on flatlands now used for agriculture - one top echelon example I have visited was growing in knee deep mud that had been repeatedly churned up by cattle.

    'Eddie's White Wonder' was originated by H. M. Eddie of Vancouver, B. C. in 1945. Although much admired otherwise it is only partially resistant to dogwood leaf spot and twig blight.
     
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  10. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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    I guess we're veering a bit off topic from the original post but I found Ron B's comments very interesting about Garry Oak growing in wet conditions. What an adaptable tree! I don't think I'll ever find a document again which suggested that - perhaps thousands of years ago - Quercus garryana was the dominant tree species on Vancouver Island.

    Where I live, Arbutus menziesii are declining and dying at tragically accelerating rates, not to be much of a threat to Garry Oaks anymore. The survivor, out-competing both arbutus and western red cedar (Thuja plicata), are Douglas fir trees (Pseudotsuga menziesii).

    And, yes, as a sad, self-appointed authority about anthracnose on native dogwood trees (Cornus nuttallii), Cornus 'Eddie's White Wonder' can also be afflicted.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Due, resumably to climate change many local Douglas firs are in visibly poor shape these days, with thin, dull crowns and stunted growth rates. One site I was on this week a very lush looking redcedar was flanked on both sides by a number of unhappy firs, that looked like they weren't going to be around sometime in the not too distant future. All were on the same ridge and in the same general height range.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2019
  12. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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    What do you think is the explanation for poor health with the firs? I do not see that here at all but the cedars are dying by the dozen due to years of inadequate water during the spring and summer.
     
  13. Partelow

    Partelow Active Member

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    Further about Garry Oak, the Alberni Valley is not usually considered part of its range, but I know of a small “grove” on Kitsuksis hill. There are also a few planted trees here and there. I planted one in my brother’s back yard and it thrived. Is the one on River Road by the Somass hotel still there? Getting farther off topic, port Alberni should consider giving heritage status to the seqouiadendron on the site of the old Tidebrook Motel.
     
  14. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Garry oak is a longtime First Nations orchard crop, with some "populations" within its range not being natural.
     
  15. Partelow

    Partelow Active Member

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    Native peoples also harvested the local crab apple, Malus nootkatensis. I am not aware that they intentionally planted it or simply took advantage.
     
  16. Creatrix

    Creatrix Active Member

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    OK all of a sudden I have an urge to plant more than one tree ;~}

    Useful and detailed info here, thank you all. I am leaning towards dogwood now ~ although, I b&b guest suggested this morning that I research American Sycamore for shade and quick growth.

    Do you folks have any thoughts or experience with this tree?

    Looked up: “Eddies White Wonder” Glorious! I will check with local Nursery to see if they carry them: and, I will pop over re: "... Garry Oak, .... Is the one on River Road by the Somass hotel still there? "

    I am not clear though on one thing: can I plant the new tree into the hole that the stump grinder will leave? Do I need to bring in compost or new soil?

    Thank you again Folks for your help.

    ps: approx 8 years ago, we planted a Sequoia in the backyard... we were aghast as how quickly it grew! Yes, had to remove it age 6. Either that or charge it rent.
     
  17. Creatrix

    Creatrix Active Member

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    I love the jelly from the crabapples. If this is indeed the same tree. I was under the impression not to plant a Malus if you have other apple trees because it can spread a fungus. Is this a myth?
     
  18. Creatrix

    Creatrix Active Member

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    Sorry for the late response... It took me a while to find where the Tidebrook Motel used to be (I believe that there was a lovely old house on site that became a restaurant for a while) We stopped and looked around but all I could find was a very sad old tree that had been losing its leaves.. and yes, this is a guess, it looked like an oak. Then, ironically enough, yesterday we drove by and the city was starting to cut it down and sawing it into blocks. Something sad about losing such an old specimen. I will continue to work on getting over to the Somass and take a look, this time with a camera.
     
  19. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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    Ya know... I would advise against planting anything that grows fast. Things that grow fast usually mean lotsa work, and big usually means the low branches are shed. Clean-up work after every storm, trimming more often, busy work that intrudes upon the owner's time & wallet. For a screen for people, keep in mind that people are generally only about 6 1/2 feet high. Everything over seven feet is superfluous to screening street traffic, except maybe buses and trucks. Low branching trees are often small trees, often no wider than tall.

    In fact, there are shrubs that would probably serve your purposes better. A row of 'Blue Girl', 'Blue Boy', or 'Honey Maid' Hollies, all are cultivars of Ilex x meserveae, are nice looking, evergreen, and spend most of their careers under ten feet. They grow very low branches all the way to the ground and you never have to tell children not to run into them or hide in them when they play kick-the-can. If you really want a tree, too, an American Holly tree, Ilex opaca will provide year-around cover from helicopters.

    The basic conundrum that people face when planting stuff is balancing the costs of paying someone else to grow something big enough to be useful, now, or saving money by buying cheap and suffering through the years it takes to grow to a suitable size, or buying something cheap that quickly grows to your serviceable size, and beyond, then beyond that, too. Speaking as an old man, I think it's better to find a commercial vendor who has some ~five foot slow-growing plants, pay the piper, and be done with it.
     
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  20. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The replacement tree should be planted without amendments near the site of the stump, but probably not exactly where the stump was. With all that broken up organic matter still remaining in the soil.

    The current binomial (per Flora of the Pacific Northwest, 2018, University of Washington Press, Seattle) for the Oregon or wild crabapple is Malus fusca (Raf.) C.K. Schneid. Although disease resistant it is not particularly effective as a decorative tree, being remarkably inconspicuous in flower and fruit - it's one time of being colorful each year is in the autumn, when its leaves turn.

    Intact Garry oak wood is useful for making decorative objects, if the remains of the one being removed were destined to being merely discarded they should have gone to local craft makers instead. Wild Garry oaks of much size can be - and often are - hundreds of years old. For instance a much noticed yet declining landmark specimen on the site of the US Post Office in Oak Harbor, WA was seen to have dated back to the 1600s after having been cut down.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
  21. Creatrix

    Creatrix Active Member

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    re: new site. My thoughts also. It would be a daunting project for my 68 year old bones so I am on the lookout for someone who has experience and knowledge with this. I will assume my local nursery will be able to bring in the replacement. I am leaning towards a Red Maple (I am missing having a swing to enjoy in the garden) or a Dogwood (as recommended above).

    GARRY OAK: yes, that is what occurred to me when I saw the chain saw working as my neighbour run wood through his Alaskan mill and has produces some lovely 8 to 10 foot slabs (unfortunately, is out of town) We have a few good carvers in the valley so hopefully the word got out.
     
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  22. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Keep in mind no newly planted tree is going to be big enough to host a swing for many years.
     
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  23. Creatrix

    Creatrix Active Member

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    UPDATE: the city came by and de-limbed this ancient giant .. sat there for over a year... a naked sentinel... finally took it down. It must have been about 30 feet high (I'm guessing) I hope the wood went to a carver or woodworker. It was sad.
     

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