Appreciation: Video: Which of These Mushrooms Could Kill You?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Junglekeeper, Dec 28, 2019.

  1. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    wcutler, allelopath and Frog like this.
  2. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I love the chemistry focus of this, and how much they conveyed in a short format!
    A few inaccuracies yes, but far fewer than is usual in these kinds of things, and outweighed by some great and accessible info.
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    Inaccuracies ... please elucidate...
     
  4. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    First - points for using "elucidate" - a word that is underused like so many :-)

    The inaccuracies I notices are fairly minor matters - as I said in general I think this was an excellent short-form explanation with some interesting & accessible biochem info. I also liked that they clearly made a point of looking up current names for species. Also they provide detailed references and names of their advisors in the youtube credits.

    One I noticed was the statement on unreliability of preparing Amanita for food. It can be done reliably (eaten as food regularly in other parts of the world) however perhaps their intent was more about safety-messaging over accuracy.
    Also the phrasing implied that one boils to try to get rid of compounds, a misunderstanding that has led some folks to unintentionally trip. Boiling is one part of a process that involves getting rid of the water you boiled it in. You are not transforming compounds by boiling.
    Another was the misleading use of the term "murder/murderous." Inaccurate from a word usage point of view, but also this relates to, for example, the panic folks get into over deathcaps in their neighbourhood. Like many toxic plants and shrubs that have been inhabiting the same neighbourhood for decades, the death cap is only harmful if you eat it. It's not going to reach out and murder you :-).
    The timing on amatoxin poisoning varies with the age of the person who eats it: Their simplified explanation is fine, except that I know from experience that folks already hazardously relay this detail in support of using the "Edibility Test" for mushrooms as well as plants.
    For safety messaging purposes it would have been better if they had included in their list of effects the unexpected "coma-like" sleep effect common with A. muscaria ingestion (e.g. give someone your car keys if you take this).
    It is useful in messaging on this topic to include "inedible" as a category, as opposed to giving the impression that there are only 3 categories: Toxic, hallucinogenic, edible. However the largest categories for mushrooms are inedible or unknown.
    Also the category Edible is actually Edible For Some/Most and under certain conditions. Morels for example are not, as they said, "perfectly safe" per se.
    Although the other names were correct, the name/photo of Matsutake was not one of the north american species; the "recognition game" aspect would have been more effective in this case if they had used a local species, as the rest had an NA focus.

    I may have missed some things, but again the above is pretty minor stuff: I am more accustomed to videos, news/podcasts, written articles and other media being extremely inaccurate as a regular/reliable quality.

    Hope that was useful?
     
  5. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    About Q2, I have eaten them all, as all three have been listed as edible (at least after long boiling) mushrooms here. Some people here like Gyromitra esculenta very much. I personally have not collected it after Chernobyl accident. But before that I have eaten tens of this mushroom, without any negative effects. I still collect any Morchella esculentas and Verpa bohemicas, that I find. I have an old aspen forest where a bucketful of Verpa bohemicas is growing almost every spring. Morchella esculentas are more scarce here. Gyromitra esculenta likes to grow near to highways and also on the military polygon, wrom where I do not trust to collect food, even though the Chernobyl accident was more than 30 years ago (because of high heavy metal content).

    A Google Translate link to an Estonian article about Gyromitra esculenta:
    Google Translate
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2019
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