Appreciation: Trees I would love to grow in my climate, but it’s not possible

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by Nik, Jan 20, 2021.

  1. Nik

    Nik Rising Contributor

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    I love the Jacaranda trees. They are amazing! And blue is supposed to be the rarest color for flowers...
    Here are few pictures from Buenos Aires from few years ago. Late November.
     

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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I assume you weren't thinking people would add in trees that need a colder climate, so I've moved this to Outdoor Tropicals. Here's a Jacaranda photo from San Diego. And a Bougainvillea (may we include shrubs?).
    20110714_SanDiego_Jacaranda_Cutler_P1140816.JPG 20110714_SanDiegoHillcrest_Bougainvillea_Cutler_P1150100.JPG
     
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  3. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    Nik, I am right with you on that one. I get my Jacaranda fix from growing Paulownia, the Empress tree with it's purple flowers. Not as amazing as a Jacaranda, but the purple is still gorgeous and makes it look like an out-of-place tropical tree here in a temperate climate, especially with the huge leaves. :)
     
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  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Paulownia tomentosa produces a similar effect. However it is considered a weed in the eastern U.S.
     
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  5. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    That's right, I forgot it's prone to escape captivity over there. Does anyone know if still gets an invasive listing as far north as Connecticut?
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  7. Nik

    Nik Rising Contributor

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    Hi Wendy and thanks for moving it, yes, this is a much better place for it.
    Bougainvillea is lovely too, the only impressive specimens I have seen are grown outdoors, again, not for our climate.
     
  8. Nik

    Nik Rising Contributor

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    As Ron B pointed out, invasive in CT. It is prohibited by law to import, move, sell, purchase, transplant, cultivate or distribute it.
    A couple of years ago I thought of getting a Wisteria and allow it to grow over a large dead white ash tree in the yard. Then decided against it after I noticed multiple escapees, even along highways. The ash itself was killed by an invasive insect, the emerald ash borer...
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2021
  9. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Well-Known Member

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    I would wish for an oleander mainly for the creamy color and of course, the scent.

    Hibiscus are beautiful too

    As are bougainvillea
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Hardier oleander cultivars possible in warm and sunny planting site in Vancouver. At least for a time.
     
  11. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Must admit, I'd call those purple, not blue! And ditto for Paulownia. They're not blue like Meconopsis betonicifolia, or some Delphiniums, are blue
    Picture 219a.jpg
     
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  12. Nik

    Nik Rising Contributor

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    I don’t know... I think it is a thought call. What you give as an example is also not true blue, but more of a cyan color. Below is screenshot from Wikipedia about the color periwinkle , and many of the purple colors are in both the blue and violet categories. If one is really strict, then only flowers like these can be called true blue.
     

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  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Ah - Lobelia erinus, I very nearly cited that as another example of blue!
     
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