Identification: tall puffball id

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by allelopath, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Battarrea?

    Found in northern New Mexico, USA in Pinon-Juniper woodlands at 7000 ft asl.
    The cross-hatched area is the part that was below ground.
    I think what appears to be a cap is actually the bottom half of a puffball that has fallen down. Spores are rust colored.
    Placed on 8.5 x 11" paper for scale.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 28, 2010
  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Are you saying it doesn't have gills? Does it have a pore on top like Tulostoma?
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Take a look at these close-ups. The whitish "underside" is smooth, the top is kinda hairy (and where the spores are).
     

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  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Stem sure looks like a Tulostoma. Do you think the thin layer (Pellicle) on the cap has come off (disintegrated) with age, revealing just the spore mass (spores at various states of maturity)? were you able to find several at different stages of maturity?
     
  5. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Yes, I think the cap has come off.
    If I have a chance this afternoon, I'll go back and look for other specimens.
     
  6. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    One difference between this specimen and photos of Tulostoma on the internets is that 5" of this one was underground.
     
  7. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    there were about 100 species of Tulostoma described in the 1920's, most from the SouthWest. I'll check some books to see if any have buried stems.
     
  8. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Thank you for showing the underground portion in the photo Allelopath - that was a great idea!

    frog
     
  9. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Photos from others in the same group.
    First the tops of 2 others.
     

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  10. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Others nearby (from 3" to 3' away from original).
    None as tall as the original (purslane provides some scale)
    In the first one here, it looks like the bottom half of the ball has fallen away.
     

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  11. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Just checked the books, your specimen closely matches the genus Battarrea. "lacerate woody stalk which arises below ground from a woody volva" and "some Mexican species have a stalk of 65 cm". Also states that the gleba is often naked (i.e. no covering of the spore mass at maturity).
     
  12. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Battarrea phalloides seems likely (looking at "Mushrooms and Truffles of the Southwest/Jack S. States"
     

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