Stellata Magnolia

Discussion in 'Magnoliaceae' started by mr.shep, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    This is a stellata Magnolia we've had for a while
    that came from Henderson Experimental Gardens.
    This one has 20-25, sometimes more, tepals. See
    if you can find one online or from a book that
    matches it?

    Photos uploaded from the digital camera on
    March 3, 2006.
     

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  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Metro Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    That is a nice looking star Magnolia. Commercially I think the only one that rings a bell with me is Royal Star, I believe it was reputed to have the pink blush...
     
  3. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    jimmyq, this Star Magnolia has been sold as 'Royal Star'
    in the past. As a matter of fact we had some b&b plants
    of this Magnolia come in from an Oregon nursery that
    had 'Royal Star' labels on the plants. When they bloomed
    we knew they were not 'Royal Star'. The amount of tepals
    are close to being the same but year in and year out, this
    old form of this venerable Star Magnolia has more tepals
    even though 'Royal Star' is also listed as having 20-25
    tepals. 'Royal Star' generally does not have much pink
    blush in the interior tepals but has more of a pink blush
    to the exterior tepals when it first opens from its pink
    buds and has a light pink stripe on the backside of the
    tepals. The pink blush quickly fades out and the pink
    stripe becomes much less visible as the flower ages
    before the entire flower turns white. Even when this
    Star Magnolia fades to white there is still a light pink
    stripe on the backside of the tepal even as the tepals
    fall off the tree. Where the two Magnolias are telltale
    different is in the color of the center of the flower.
    One will hold some pink while the true 'Royal Star'
    is green in the center. Another difference is that this
    one has cupped shaped, tipped ends to the tepals and
    the 'Royal Star' has more strap-like shaped tepals with
    few to no cupped-end tepals. .

    Jim
     
  4. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    so, close but no cigar...
     
  5. Gordo

    Gordo Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Camano Island, WA
    This is an interesting form Jim.

    My knowledge of Magnolias is pretty slim, but I noticed the bloom is reminiscent of a chrysanthemum. Also noticed a listing for a stellata 'Chrysanthemumiflora'. Any relation?

    Thought I'd share a couple shots taken last week of 'Jane Platt' in my garden - it shows the diversity of forms within this group.

    'Jane Platt' RE.jpg

    J. Platt in bud.jpg
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Mixups are frequent. Lately I have seen what appears to be a Kosar-DeVos hybrid received by one local outlet as 'Alexandrina'. Another place was sent saucer magnolias as 'Heaven Scent', and received 'Rubra' star magnolias as a white cultivar (and vice versa). I am growing a 'Yellow Bird' that was sold to me as 'Butterflies'.
     

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