Sorbus hupehensis 'Pink Pagoda'

Discussion in 'Talk about UBC Botanical Garden' started by sooz, Nov 2, 2002.

  1. sooz

    sooz Member

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    Could you please forward me information on the above-mentioned UBC introduced tree? Could you also forward photos?

    Thank you!
     
  2. Larry Mroz

    Larry Mroz Member

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    Lovely plant

    I have looked for this plant as well and have never found it for sale anywhere. Does anyone know where to find it? They're looking great in the Botanical Gardens right now!
     
  3. Douglas Justice

    Douglas Justice Well-Known Member UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society 10 Years

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    Sorbus 'Pink Pagoda' is a beautiful Chinese mountain ash. For a number of years, it was propagated locally, but sales were not inspiring, so I guess propagators gave up on it. It is evidently selling well in Australia, however.

    The tree itself is an apomictic species; that is, apomicts produce fertile seed without fertilization, so all individuals of an apomictic species are clones. That means that seedlings of Pink Pagoda will be identical to Pink Pagoda.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Fruit of 'Pink Pagoda'
     

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  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    A habit shot in the winter.
     

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  6. Re: Lovely plant

    I believe one can be had at a nursery on Wayn road in Saanich, not Russell nursery but the other one which I don't know its name. I too am smitten with this tree and will be looking into getting one myself.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Eight retail sources--including two in BC--listed by THE PLANT LOCATOR - WESTERN REGION sourcebook.
     
  8. ejbjb

    ejbjb Member

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    For anyone still looking.... the Pink Pagoda is in stock at Dinter's Nursery in Duncan. They have a great website...
     
  9. Larry Mroz

    Larry Mroz Member

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    I stopped looking years ago, but maybe I should take a trip to the Island!
     
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Sorbus hupehensis has a reputation for being more susceptible to fireblight than many other rowans. Might not be a good one to plant if you're in an area where fireblight is common.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Fireblight shouldn't be a significant factor in Vancouver - it isn't in Seattle. Needs warm spring days to develop. According to a British nurseryman I discussed this with it occurs in cool and damp UK because the requisite warm spring days do happen to be a feature there. Over here it is the generally hot areas where it is found, rather than the cool and humid ones.

    I think during 1990 'Pink Pagoda' froze on at least one site (Center for Urban Horticulture) in Seattle. Afterward the Lam Garden curator told me the 1990 cold front blew around the Garden site, this may explain why the clone persisted there while failing elsewhere.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2007
  12. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Fireblight isn't a problem in most of Britain, only the southeast, and I guessed it wouldn't be too bad in the UBC area either. But I figured the warning was worth having anyway, as these forums have a vastly wider readership . . . thus my caveat "if you're in an area where fireblight is common" ;-)
     
  13. Casiah

    Casiah Member

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    Is there any info on Sorbus Hupehensis "Pink Pagoda " only producing flowers and fruit every other year.
    Our tree, about 15 years old has done this for the last 8 years and before that produced very little flower or fruit. Nevertheless it is well worth having if only for the autumn colour
     
  14. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    That's fairly normal in my experience, particularly with younger trees.
     
  15. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Propagations seen here flower and fruit well before then, often in nursery sizes.
     
  16. Corinna

    Corinna Member

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    A lovely tree! We have been admiring our neighbours for over a year now. We called around and finally located 3 at Arrowsmith Nursery in Coombs, Vancouver Island.

    Question: I am interested in the sex of this tree. Is it Male or Female? I need to know if it is a pollinator (we have allergies and are trying to garden with appropriate selections).

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2008
  17. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Both: its flowers are perfect. In addition, Sorbus may be apomictic, fruiting without pollination. You will not have to plant other kinds of Sorbus to get plenty of fruit.
     
  18. Corinna

    Corinna Member

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    Wonderful. Thank you for the information.

    We've just picked up 3 and look forward to seeing the birds which will hopefully come to feed on them.
     
  19. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  20. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    As an aside, now split off as Sorbus oligodonta 'Pink Pagoda' (Kite-leaf Rowan). It is a tetraploid apomictic plant, unlike S. hupehensis which is diploid and not apomictic.

    Another related tetraploid apomictic species is Sorbus glabrescens (White-fruited Rowan), which differs in (as in its English name) in having white, not pink, fruit (here, with autumn leaf colour, in late November):
     

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  21. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    S. glabrescens has also been grown as S. hupehensis in western gardens.
     
  22. Corinna

    Corinna Member

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    The berries must ferment over the wintertime and springtime brings with it the Varied Thrushes. At my old place, I was rescuing more than a handful of drunken thrushes each season which had hit the house. At the sound of a bang, I would run out with an old sweater or towel and scoop them up so to keep them warm and place them out of harms way (from cats, etc.) till they got their wits back and could fly away on their own steam. A beautiful bird for sure.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2008
  23. sabaf

    sabaf Active Member

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    Is it true the botanical name of this tree is now Sorbus pseudohupehensis ("pseudo" has been added to "hupehensis"?)
     
  24. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yes, that's correct, a recent change only published in the last year or so. It turned out that 'Pink Pagoda' is not the same species as either Sorbus hupehensis or Sorbus oligodonta, so it had to be described as a new species.

    Same applies to the plants cultivated as Sorbus glabrescens (mentioned above, post #20), these proved not to be the same as the original description of that species, and are now re-named as Sorbus glabriuscula.

    These white-fruited rowans are a complex set! See New Trees (Grimshaw & Bayton, IDS/Kew 2009) for more detail.
     
  25. mindyarbo

    mindyarbo Member

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    Re: Sorbus pseudohupehensis 'Pink Pagoda'

    i'm z.5, Boston Mass. area of U.S. My specimen, 4 yrs in the ground here, now 20'H, has never berried. I have read all the entries on this thread. Anyone other than the British poster have an experience where their Pink Pagoda did not fruit for many yrs? Is there likely anything I could do to quicken that process (aside from hitting it w/ a baseball bat, like w/ my wisteria?)!!? Thanks for your help.
     

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