Snowball bush

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Theresa Kraklau, May 30, 2021.

  1. Theresa Kraklau

    Theresa Kraklau New Member

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    I have a question about my father's snowball bush, I was uncertain what it was until I actually seen one flower on it about 2 weeks ago. But I noticed that leaves look like they're getting eaten up by a bug so I looked on the leaves and there is little worms on it so I sprayed it with Neem oil, but it still looks like it's dying out. I am trying to save it as my father has passed I'm trying to send pictures hopefully somebody can give me some insight on it as to what to do and if it's savable I want to transplant it into a area where it's got more sunlight
     

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  2. Sulev

    Sulev Well-Known Member

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    Snowball bush is extremely attractive to the bird-cherry ermine (Yponomeuta evonymella). Its caterpillars can often eat all the leaves from the bush. Fortunately, the bush survives this kind of pest attack surprisingly easily. Don't worry, your bush will most probably stay alive!!
     
  3. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Your snowball bush (Viburnum opulus) is not in very good shape due to its location and perhaps its age too. For one thing, viburnums need medium to moist conditions which I doubt it gets now where it is growing - competing for water with the trees nearby. It could be that when it was first planted, it got more water and sunshine that it does now that the trees have grown larger. Transplanting it would be very difficult.

    If it were mine, I'd take cuttings and start a new shrub to eventually plant in a more suitable spot - sun to part shade with access to water. Now would be the perfect time to do so. ("...viburnum cuttings taken in mid to late spring, which are softwood cuttings, tend to root much easier.")
    Read more at Gardening Know How: Rooting Viburnum Cuttings: How To Propagate Viburnum From Cuttings --https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/viburnum/rooting-viburnum-cuttings.htm

    Having said that however, I was surprised to see this notice on the Missouri Botanical Garden website:
    "This plant has been found to be weedy and potentially invasive and should not be planted in Midwestern gardens."
    Viburnum opulus - Plant Finder
     
  4. Theresa Kraklau

    Theresa Kraklau New Member

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    Thank you I was kind of hoping that I could save it when I was reading up on it I saw that it needed more sunshine and when dad had first planted it all the trees weren't there. I will try to get some cuttings from it and start a new bush. Thank you very much for responding I am in Michigan
     
  5. Theresa Kraklau

    Theresa Kraklau New Member

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    Thank you for your response that gives me some hope.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2021
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I you don't know there is poison ivy on the tree right next to your viburnum. Snowball bush is conventionally a reference to the ball shaped white flowers of Viburnum opulus 'Roseum'. This fruitless horticultural selection will not have any ability to be invasive.
     
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  7. Theresa Kraklau

    Theresa Kraklau New Member

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    Yes I noticed the poison ivy I was very careful when I was spraying it my plan is to dig it up and put it in the front yard where there's more sunlight and pray and hope that it makes it

    Believe me I immediately came in and took a shower
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 31, 2021

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