Sick Jasmine

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Eric La Fountaine, Jun 7, 2005.

  1. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The following was received via email:

    Good Morning,

    Please could you help us find out what is wrong with my jasmine? We have it since one year as you see from the first pictures it was blooming (several times) but since some months it has started to loose leafs even the new leafs get yellow and fall. We changed the soil, fertilize it and we water it once a week. Since two weeks it is outside. It is not a climbing jasmine more like a small tree.

    Would be very grateful if you could help us keep it alive

    Regards

    maya

    (Aurora, Ontario)
     

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  2. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

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    We have received your concerns about your Jasmine. Before we can give an adequate diagnosis we request some more information from you.

    1. Do you know the species name of your Jasmine?
    2. Is it an indoor plant? Have you moved it outside before? Did it have a similar problem?
    3. What is the location of the plant? I.e., is it South/North facing? How much sunlight does it receive and is it under direct summer sunlight? Does it get any protection? Generally, Jasmines prefer sun but can react poorly to intense summer sunlight, especially if they are used to receiving filtered light over winter.
    4. What kind of fertilizer are you using and how often do you apply it? (A general note, when you apply dissolving fertilizer make sure you water the plant first, then apply the fertilized water about an hour later to ensure it is absorbed into the soil. If you are applying a slow release fertilizer it needs to be covered with some soil to be effective).
    5. Have you noticed any pests or bugs on the leaves or stems? There are some common pests that attack Jasmines including mealybugs, aphids and scale insects. Other signs may be cobwebs on the leaves.
    6. Are there any spots on the leaves?
    7. When you water, do you let it dry out between waterings? Jasmines prefer to be moist rather than dried out between waterings (but they do need good drainage).

    In order to diagnose, we need to know the species so that we can determine its hardiness zone and any problems there may be adapting to your zone.
     
  3. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hello Maya, your plant looks like Murraya paniculata to me. M. paniculata is often called jasmine. I see the yellowing. Did this start after it was placed outside or before? Neither this plant nor most jasmines can handle cold temps. If it has been below or near 10° C (50° F) that would stress the plant. Neither likes to be wet, so make sure not to overwater. M. paniculata likes part sun part shade. It should be fertilized in the spring. (Overfertilization is a possibility.)

    I hope that helps. Do a search for Murraya paniculata to see if you agree with me on the ID.
     
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Hi, Maya. I agree with Eric's identification of this plant as Murraya paniculata. From my experience with this plant it appears to be normal to have some but not much yellowing and subsequent shedding of the older leaves during the growing season. Yellowing of new growth is an indication of a problem.

    Could it be that the plant has been suffering from a lack of humidity while indoors? Drafts from central heating vents contribute to this problem. Is the water alkaline where you are? If this is the case, try using an acid fertilizer as this plant prefers an acidic medium.

    As an aside, according to a book I read recently the term jessamine was created in an attempt to distinguish plants such as this one from true jasmines (Jasminum). Thus one of the common names for this plant is Orange Jessamine as opposed to Orange Jasmine. I will be updating my plant label accordingly.
     
  5. hi Eric, thanks for your mail, i dont know anything about the exact name of the jasmine i bought it as jasmine. The yellowing startet already inside. we bought it ca. june 04 it was blooming several times and after 6 months it startet to go yellow. Maybe my husband overfertilized it. When the yellowing began he changed the soil and put some slow release fertilizer in it and in spring again some 20-8-20. You are right i searched in the internet for the Murray Paniculata and the plant shown there is like ours.
    thanks again maya
     
  6. Thank you very much for your mail. I will try to answer all your questions as good as I can .
    1. I think it is Murray Paniculata ( looked up in the internet the plant with this name
    was similar to ours).

    2. When we bought it ca. July 04 kept it first inside and it bloomed
    several times. (we were told that in spring we can bring the plant outside)
    Ca. Jan/Feb. the yellowing started.
    In April we changed the soil "All purpose potting soil( Garden Club 59-4545-2 from
    Canadian Tire) containg loam, sphagnum peat moss, sand and other ingridients not
    named.
    But nothing changed the new leafs were still getting yellow and falling.

    3. Inside location east window a little morning sun.
    Outside location also east not direct sun.

    4. slow release fertilizer used when changing the soil in April,
    and 20-8-20 twice in May.

    5. No we have not seen any pests or bugs not on the stem and not on the leafs.

    6. No there are no spots the leafs turn gradually from green to yellow and fall.

    7. We water it once a week but keep an eye on it that it does not dry out and the
    the pot is on a "plate" so e can see if we overwater it.

    Hope you can find out what is wrong with the plant and once again thank you very much for your help
    maya
     
  7. have been reading this thread with interest - i have a similar problem with my jasmine.
    it's an indoor plant, which i've had for two years. in the last several months, it has developed a strange leaf disease i haven't seen in any of my other plants. the tips of the leaves turn a lighter green, and then break off without turning brown. the affected area covers anywhere from the tip to half the leaf, and the plant now looks as if someone has gone at it with scissors, trimming all the leaves, but otherwise, no sign of browning, yellowing, or anything else, and it continues to grow (stems look healthy and there is lots of new leaf growth). new leafs become infected within a few weeks, though, and suffer the same unsightly fate. i was thinking leafminers, but there are no trails to be seen. any ideas? thanks much to all for any responses.
     
  8. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    Do you know what kind of jasmine it is? Has anything changed in the last several months? It is really hard to diagnose a plant without seeing it in person. If you can answer the questions the Hort board asked the other person we would be better able to answer. Also you can take it to a good local nursery, you can even call ahead of time to find out who their expert is and when they are available.
     
  9. pamhuff

    pamhuff Member

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    Do you mist it every day? This seems to keep mine happy
     
  10. FlowerNut

    FlowerNut Member

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    Those great little trees require humidity, water, good drainage, food in the spring and hate it when you change their surroundings. I have had great success with these trees by just living by those rules. Mine are growing like crazy and bloom constantly. If you have yours in a pot, make sure it is big one. They like to spread out.
     
  11. hrandolph

    hrandolph Member

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    A friend gave me some see from his Murraya Paniculata. They are not dry yet and the pods are red in color. I asume that there are several seed inside the red small pods.
    I guess I should let them dry an suppose plant them on a propagation mat with the temperature held at 75-80º F with much misting.
    If this sounds ok, please let me know.
    Henry Randolph
     
  12. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    There should be two white seeds inside the red fruit. Make sure fruit is mature and sow the seed fresh.
     

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