Shiroshima (Hibanobambusa tranquillans)

Discussion in 'Poaceae' started by bcislander, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. bcislander

    bcislander Member

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    Campbell River, BC, Canada
    My wife and I recently moved from a large acreage to a small, urban lot and would like to turn it into our private 'garden oasis'. A key component is screening with hedges and climbing vines - allowing for a variety of light conditions.


    We have decided to utilize a variety of plants for hedges - typical cedar hedge in front yard; California Lilac along a raised retaining wall; AND would like to consider the Shiroshima (Hibanobambusa tranquillans) as a hedge for a southeast facing fenceline which will be approx. 24 feet long. We are planning to place the bamboo in an enclosed retaining wall which will be about 2 to 3 feet wide.

    The area gets great mid-morning to mid-afternoon sunlight; is well drained; has plenty of amended soil; and well protected from any heavy winds.

    Does this sound like a suitable bamboo variety for this location? We reside in Campbell River on Vancouver Island. Thanks
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    This is a running bamboo with largish leaves. Probably be happier with a Fargesia.
     
  3. bcislander

    bcislander Member

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    I was under the impression that Fargesia did not like hot, midday sun? Our chosen location is subject to mid-morning sun through till mid-afternoon and currently has little shade protection - although we are planting a willow tree nearby, which eventually will throw some shade on the bamboo...

    I have not seen any mature Fargesia but have heard that Fargesia murielaeis a particularly attractive bamboo - does it retain most of its leaves during the winter months?
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Try Fargesia robusta.
     
  5. bcislander

    bcislander Member

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    I will, thank you for that suggestion. However I have two more questions - with one which I really do not understand well. When I explore the internet about Fargesia there is a lot of discussion about it being 'in flower' and how difficult it is to get a 'new generation' seedling? Is this something I need to worry about when approaching a nursery?

    The second questions is with regards to the Fargesia robusta - is it as pretty a variety as the Fargesia murielae? I do realize that is a very subjective type question, but would appreciate anyone's opinion on the two.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    One Fargesia is in flower, Fargesia nitida. Various other species are cultivated. You can find pictures of F. robusta online, decide if you like it. A local supplier may also have planted out display plants or even large tubbed specimens for sale from which you can get an idea. Also look at Species Source Table on American Bamboo Society web site. There you can see basic information like hardiness, size potential and light exposure in a quick glance table format.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2006
  7. bcislander

    bcislander Member

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    Great - thanks for the information, it has been very useful. I will explore the American Bamboo Society website. Bamboo is just starting to have some interest here in Campbell River, Vancouver Island - so the nurseries usually need to make special orders on request. Makes it difficult to visualize except via pictures.
     
  8. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Here are two examples of bamboo hedges in Japan. Both are hardy. Shibatea works well as a low hedge, but I have grown it up to three feet tall. For a tighter hedge, it probably works best up to three feet. It is a profilic runner and should be contained.

    I don't have Semiarundinaria fastuosa, but this 10 foot tall hedge I saw in Japan is very impressive. It's ramrod straight culms and dense foliage at the nodes with what appears to be pruning would make it ideal for hedges. It is reputed to have a tendency to clump rather than run if the soil is not excessively rich. It's reputed to be hardy to -22C.


    Shibatea Kumasaca
    JapanTrip2005bamboohedge800.jpg


    Semiarundinaria fastuosa

    JapanTrip2005bamboohedgetall800.jpg
     

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