Sempervivum propagation help?

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by lorax, Aug 8, 2007.

  1. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I'm under the impression that all that is required to propagate a sempervivum from its pups is to remove the pup and stick it in the dirt, with water.

    It can't really be that simple, can it? I've got several large clumps I want to break up and distribute through a xeriscape, but I don't want to do something wrong and end up killing them all.

    In a related question, will sempervivum come reliably from seed? For example, if I were to plant mature flowerheads?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    Your information is correct, it is that easy. Success in a really dry locale is improved by planting pups that already have a few roots growing, but any of them should survive with a little supplementry water.
     
  3. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Wow, cool! I can start my xeriscaping today, then.
     
  4. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    A little sand on the soil surface, 1/8" deep, may help.
     
  5. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    You've just described my soil's basic condition in the area I'm xeriscaping. The sempervivums I have are tremendously happy, but they're overcrowding, so I was going to use them as a bit of groundcover before the creeping opuntias.
     
  6. link2007

    link2007 Active Member

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    You can do that with almost all succulents. You show let the ends calluss up to reduce risk of rot.
     

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