Scratching the Itch

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Kaitain4, Jan 12, 2012.

  1. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    And I think my rootstock problem may have been precipitated by some root pruning I did to get them to fit in the 4" pots better. Next time I'm trying smaller plugs and probably a different vendor.

    P.S. Your grafts look very nice!
     
  2. SFyffe

    SFyffe Active Member

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    Thanks K4...

    Last July I had a grower in my area graft a Virdis scion that I brought to him on common green root stock.

    Stripped the leaves from the scion. Stripped most of the leaves from the root stock. Not all of them though.

    He put a bag around the graft just like we did during winter grafting.
    Told me to put in the shade.
    No watering for a week and then very small amounts to keep the soil moist.
    10 days in I untied the bag.
    Another week I took the bag completely off.

    This year it took off. It was a double graft and both survived. It's been fun watching it heal.

    I cant say there is much difference in technique. Are you doing something any different?


    Stephen
     
  3. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Maybe I'm not leaving enough leaves on the understock. Otherwise it sounds like what I'm doing. However, I do not strip the leaves off the scions. I cut the leaf off and leave the petiole. The petioles eventually turn black and fall off, leaving a new bud.
     
  4. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    K4,just wondered when you potted up your rootstock for the latest grafts.I was a little worried about root pruning,especially as I had those long tap(type)roots which left little behind.However I knew they'd have plenty of time to grow again and harden off before it got cold here.I only had one rootstock failure which was obvious because it still wobbled about in the pot come grafting time.
     
  5. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Potted up in November
     
  6. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    Hmm,don't know about your winters but that's ok for me,doesn't get cold here 'til January or even feb. these days.
     
  7. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    We had a very mild winter. I had annuals from last year (including petunias) that actually never died and are blooming as we speak. That's how mild it was.
     
  8. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    Then personally I think they should have been ok,the mystery continues.When I picked up my rootstock,I was surprised to see they had leaves,albeit shrivelled and drooping.They must have been pulled from the ground while still in leaf.I wondered if they were already on borrowed time but as I said they all came through come grafting time.They're obviously tougher than they look.
    Like yourself I didn't have much luck summer grafting.My first wave was a disaster,I made the mistake of cutting the rootstock right down to the final position.I believe you can get away with this if you have good scions,nice warm weather and know when the best time is.....none of which I have ha.The die back of the rootstocks was clearly evident.
    The next batch did better,I left a few inches of rootstock above the graft but no leaves(much like winter).I also left the petioles intact.I didn't bag or wrap the grafts at all but I may do so just to increase my chances this year.I think I had the best results late in the year(aug/sep) when the weather was actually warmer.It seems you can graft anytime the rootstock is active.After fall colours had faded and most leaves had dropped,I knocked off a branch of Tamukeyama when repotting in November.Darkness came so I went back inside but noticed a failed earlier graft had sprouts on the rootstock....so I thought what the heck and grafted it.I left it indoors for a few weeks to heal and now it is just emerging!
    I plan to get more red matsumurae(in appearance)rootstocks this summer and will graft all but the strong palmate types on these.They're not cheap(£1.95)but are already potted up in 11cms pots...saves a lot of work.
    Looking forward to trying it all again :)
     
  9. SFyffe

    SFyffe Active Member

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    Hi K4,

    So are you going to try Summer grafting again?

    I am looking at root stock myself now. I talked to a grafter a bit today and she said that one of the most important things to consider is temperature during summer grafting. No grafting above 80 degrees. (a.k.a morning time) They start usually in July and graft all the way through September and only graft in the mornings and then immediately new grafts go under mist. These most stifling months for us in the South. I'll give it a try...


    Stephen
     
  10. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    Well,thought it was time to unwrap the grafts as the cling-film and rubber bands were becoming as one.Was quite pleased with the revised grafting method,turned out nice and central and upright.Cambium mated both sides and even the flimsy flaps stayed alive.The 3rd pic shows more clearly the tapered cut used on the rootstock.
     

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  11. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member

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    Just thought I'd post a warning to anyone storing their young grafts outside on the ground.Perhaps common knowledge and maybe not so applicable to anyone who actually gets a summer :( but this year with all the rain I've found snails and slugs attacking young maples for the first time.They've removed 50% of branches of my best Ukigomo(last years graft) so be aware :)
     

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