sago palm outdoor question

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by honolua, Mar 6, 2008.

  1. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    Hi,
    Any idea how "big" or old sagos need to be before planting them outside in Zone 8-9? I have a healthy one that is about 2-3 feet tall from soil to top of latest fronds and it would look great in my yard....I understand they are pretty cold hardy?
    thanks,
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not actually very cold-hardy, particularly not in climates with cold wet winters like Vancouver - this makes them very prone to root rot. Basically, an indoor plant in the winter, when it needs to be kept dry and cool but not cold.
     
  3. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Cycas revoluta is certainly marginal at best in zone 8 regions around the PNW. A protected micro-climate with relatively dry winter soil is best. A quick burlap covering during the worst cold and weather will help as well. Remove burlap once weather returns to near normal.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  4. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    I will try that.....great photos of some larger ones on the Pacific Northwest Palm Society (hardypalm.com). There are some from some photo tours, and I have seen a couple outdoors here in the lower mainland (Richmond nurseries to be exact). I think I will let mine grow a bit more indoors, and maybe try it outdoors next summer,, once it has a bit more time to mature.

    Again, thank you so much for your helpful advice!
     
  5. Sunset Cycads

    Sunset Cycads Active Member 10 Years

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    The one I planted out last fall with a caudex the size of a small grapefruit did okay this past winter here on the Sunshine Coast. However, it is planted on a sand pile and has excellent drainage. Also, last winter was not that cold. (You would think it was spring already, the way I say "last winter"). They are definitely marginal in our wet climate here; if you are going to plant it out, the best place is under the eaves next to your house.
     
  6. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years

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    I have several outside the same size as Sunset Cycads, one of them has been outside for four years now, and puts off a new flush every summer it isn't protected from the rain, and I would say that it isn't in great draining soil either. The others which are under the roof line, and in well drained soil look pretty much the same as the other one.
     
  7. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Carol ... how does the foliage hold up in most winters?

    Cheers, LPN (Barrie)
     
  8. islandweaver

    islandweaver Active Member

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    I have a small sago in a small pot with well-draining soil. It spent its second winter outside with no protection and it looks just fine. I'm planning to plant it into the garden this year in a well-draining area. I live on a peninsula on an island. We don't get as much rain as say Vancouver or Seattle gets, or even as the other side of Salt Spring Island. Diane
     
  9. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I didn't notice when I was through, but I'd be willing to bet there are some planted at Grace Point in Ganges.

    Cheers, LPN (Barrie)
     
  10. islandweaver

    islandweaver Active Member

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    I haven't noticed Barrie. But by now they are probably hidden amongst all the trachys that Joe planted there. I'll have to take a stroll down there one day and take a look. I look at Joe as sort of Salt Spring Island's Johnny Appleseed with a little more panache. He gave me a list of what he thought I could grow in my garden some years ago and Cycad revolutas was one of them. I'm still working my way through his list. Diane
     
  11. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    You're right, Joe's got plenty of enthusiasm. Bruce has planted quite a few things around Grace Point too. I always make it a point of checking in with Joe when I'm on Salt Spring.

    Cheers, LPN (Barrie).
     
  12. Carol Ja

    Carol Ja Active Member 10 Years

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    LPN ...I get a few brown bits, but as I get a new flush every year, I don't worry about the ick bits. I don't recall seeing any Cycads at Grace Point.
     
  13. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Thanks Carol ... I have several and was considering one for outdoor growing. They sat in my unheated coldframe all winter and look just fine. I'll take the plunge this spring then.
    Spring break for you yet? I may be around SSI in the near future.

    Cheers, Barrie (LPN)
     
  14. honolua

    honolua Active Member

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    Check this lovely photo from the Pacific Northwest Palm Society Seattle Garden tour a couple of years ago. As well, I believe one of the tropical nurseries here in Richmond has a Sago the same size outside in the ground. I will try mine outside when it is a bit more mature....still is only about 2-3 feet tall.

    Interestingly, I planted a Pheonix Robelinii in a giant cedar planter box, and set it outside. This was a rare find with a single trunk, and not a cluster. It was looking sickly and was literally bursting out of it's pot with the root ball cracking the plastic; it had split the plastic right down the side. It is about 1-2 feet (trunk hight) and has sprung back from looking shocked and dying, to perky, green and with new fronds!!!! I will keep my fingers crossed...who knew? Wish me luck!
    Honolua
     

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  15. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    This is a classic case of staged or recent plantings. Non of these plams or cycads spent any length of time at this location. The Trachycarpus palms are heavily pruned with very small crowns for the normal dimensions usually associated with them.

    Cheers, LPN.
     

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