Rose Bush Dying! Help!

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by 8675309Jenny, Sep 3, 2009.

  1. 8675309Jenny

    8675309Jenny Member

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    I have 2 rose bushes in pots that have REALLY suffered this year. I am in an area that has recieved an extensive amount of rain this year. Blackspot is eating them up!
    This is actually a good picture, now the plant is down to 2 branches all the rest have died. Last year this plant was flourishing with 6" blooms and it was VERY full! Is there anything I can do to save it before it completely dies?
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Maybe the potting medium has been too wet this season and they are dying off from rotting of the roots. If they are mostly gone and blackspot susceptible anyway your best bet may be to start over with fresh specimens of a disease-resistant cultivar.
     
  3. 8675309Jenny

    8675309Jenny Member

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    I have 3 rose bushes total and the other 2 are making it ok, however, they have blackspot as well. I don't know much about blackspot, are the disease resistant completely resistant or do they go through periods but just not as severe? The reason I am asking is I also have 3 miniture roses that get blackspot when they are in the rain, but it is limited and doesn't consume them. It seems to affect only a few leaves.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Thousands of cultivars with disease resistance varying from hopelessly inadequate to complete or nearly so in a given location. Leaf fungus strains mutate rapidly so the situation may change in a particular location, as well as already varying from one place to another. As a result of them becoming seen as too much trouble, due to the longstanding lack of taking disease resistance into consideration when breeding new cultivars, the general public has been losing interest in garden roses. This has prompted selecting of some new introductions with disease resistance in mind. Major suppliers who sell widely to garden centers are coming out with whole new series promoted as being much less prone to fungus infestation.
     
  5. 8675309Jenny

    8675309Jenny Member

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    I will definitely check into that! I have had great success with roses. I live in zone 7 where it is virtually hot year round! (OK it is to me) winters are mild. Humidity, however, remains fairly constant in spring summer and fall which is very high. I know my roses have always done better in March/April and September/October because the summer are usually so hot and humid!

    Thank you for the advice.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Long bloom was bred into roses by using China roses and related forms adapted to hot and wet summers. Surely this helps make it possible to grow modern hybrid roses over a wide area, even in places as tropical as Honolulu. Of course, different cultivars do better in some areas than others. And black spot susceptibility also came from using certain susceptible species and ancient hybrids as parents (many, if not most wild rose species are not susceptible to black spot).
     

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