Rhododendrons: Rhododendron: Jean Marie de Montague

Discussion in 'Ericaceae (rhododendrons, arbutus, etc.)' started by lily, Mar 31, 2008.

  1. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi everyone,
    Today I purchased a new rhodie. I'm sure I will love it's bright red blooms. I want to know if it will grow well on the north west side of my house. It will get morning shade and afternoon sun. If not, where is the best place to plant it? Thanks again for all your help.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yes it will grow there. I have had one in full sun since the 1960s. The only thing to watch is that yours doesn't get baked by heat off of your wall late in the day during summer, be sure to monitor watering and keep the roots cool with mulching - especially during its early years.
     
  3. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    That's great Ron. I'll plant it a 2 or 3 of feet away from the wall. I hope that is far enough away. I also bought some peat moss to mix in the soil and I'll top it with mulch. Now to get out my shovel. Oh I forgot to ask you if it pest resistant?
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Skip the peat - unless you dig it into the entire bed all around the plant. Do not amend only the planting hole backfill. Even if amending entire potential rooting area of the shrub you will still have the problem of the peat decomposing and returning the soil to its original condition. In a hot climate this might take only a year.

    Have not had serious problems with weevils, root rot or mildew on ours. Has maintained same general appearance for decades. Cannot say the same for others, for instance a few years after mildew showed up here large 'Virginia Richards' that had been producing flower trusses the size of basketballs were defoliated and dead.
     
  5. Olafhenny

    Olafhenny Active Member 10 Years

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    I have heard you make that statement a couple of times. Can you please explain why? I have used a mixture of peat moss and native soil almost every time, I have planted something and with great success. It keeps the moisture around the root stock even and as it decomposes provides an increased organic component to the soil. As our soil here is fairly alkaline, I have been able to get the area with Siberian cypress going only after liberal application of peat moss and phosphates.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  7. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Ron
    Thanks Ron for all your wonderful information. The guy at the nursery told me to mix in some peat moss and you suggest that I shouldn't. What is the purpose of peat moss anyway? BTW, how tall is your Jean Marie? I googled it and found a site that says it can grow about 7ft tall. The label on the plant says about 5'x5'. I'm going to plant it at the north west front corner of my mobile home. Thanks again Ron!!
    ~ oops, you just answered my question about the purpose of peat moss to Olaf's post. Thanks.
     
  8. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Another question please?
    I just googled 'Jean Marie' and on the Montrovia website, it named a couple of
    'companion' plants for this rhodie. ie; valentine pieris, mandarine lights azalea. What does 'companion' plants mean?
    Thanks again.
     
  9. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    As a plant shopper I have always found it to be an annoying term (patronizing even), but I think it is meant to mean plants that either look good with the plant you've chosen, or that thrive in similar conditions. The problem with the term is that it makes a lot of assumptions about your needs, plant preferences, and growing conditions, and that it can mean different conditions when used in different contexts.
     
  10. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks Karen. Actually, I wouldn't mind knowing what else /color etc. would look good planted with this rhododendrum. Because it's red, I'm thinking something yellow or orange? Another rhodie or perhaps something else? Any ideas?
     
  11. Mike in North Vancouver

    Mike in North Vancouver Member

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    Lily, I just bought the same rhodo yesterday. The planting guide suggests it will grow to 5' which I understand should be the height in about 10years. I plan to plant it in full sun in the south east corner of my lot (I agonized over this a couple of days ago in a post of mine on Planting Help). I understand that planting in full sun may keep it a bit more compact over the years and I am hoping mine will come in at about 4'.

    In terms of what to plant near it, you may want to consider what it will look like when it blooms. If it is red on the yellow side then yellows and oranges may look fine. If it is red on the blue side, then you may want to plant blues and purples. Then again, this may only matter if your companion plants are blooming at the same time as your rhodo. I have seen some pics of the Jean Marie de Montague; but, I am not entirely clear on what shade of red I will get in my garden.

    I was planning to plant my rhodo this weekend and am still a little up in the air now from the previous posts about what is the best way to plant. It looks like it is important to provide mulch on the outside; however, I am wondering if people might recap how best to deal with the hole. Brian Minter suggests adding sand underneath the rhodo so that the roots don't sit in water. The consensus in this forum seems to be that you shouldn't add peat to the sides of the root ball. In terms of filling in the sides of the hole, should you just add native soil or should this be mixed with mulch or something else? I don't want to hijack your thread Lily; however, I was thinking that you may be wanting the same tips too.

    Best of luck with your rhodo.

    Cheers.

    Mike
     
  12. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Pick a spot with suitable soil and exposure and plant in existing soil. Or excavate and replace entire potential rooting area with suitable soil. Or place a layer of suitable soil over the existing soil. Do not plant in pockets of one soil surrounded by another, or with zones of different soil (including sand) beneath or beside the rootball.
     
  13. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi Mike,
    No you didn't hijack my thread. LOL ~ Hey, we both want to know right? Well, I'm not going to use peat moss as Ron recommended. I'm simply going to plant it in the existing soil. I won't be using sand either. I've been doing some reading too and I've found out that Rhododendrons like moist soil, esp on hot sunny days. The instructions say to soak the root ball first and give it some general fertilizer after planting. Mine will be getting morning shade and afternoon sun. My dh and I are planting it tonight when he gets home from work. BTW, your idea to wait and see if the blooms are a warm or cool red would be a wise decision. Thanks for the suggestion. I wish you every success with yours too. Hey, let's post some photos of our 'Jean Montague' after they get some blooms. That would be fun! Happy Gardening.
     
  14. Mike in North Vancouver

    Mike in North Vancouver Member

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    Ron, thanks very much for the quick summary. It was very helpful as beforehand I was moving in the zonal/pocket direction. Lily, I will take pictures of my rhodo when it blooms and if I can figure a way to post photos on the site, I will try to do so. Take care.

    Mike
     
  15. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Best to keep roots cool with shading such as mulch and the plant's own foliage rather than attempting to do so with heavy watering as hot and wet root zones promote the growth of root-rotting water molds. Where climates are hot enough these cannot be grown even in the shade of trees because the root zones are too hot.
     
  16. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Just letting you all know that my Jean Montague that I planted in April is doing wonderful so far. I bought three more beauties this morning, I am planning to have them grow down one side of my lawn. On the northwest side of my home. They will get morning shade and afternoon sun.

    I have (2) questions please...

    1. How far apart do I plant them? The tag states that it will grow 5'x5'. Does that mean to plant them at least 5' apart?

    2. Do I feed them rhododendron food now? or wait until spring.

    Thank you.
     
  17. lily

    lily Active Member 10 Years

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    Oh yes, I forgot to ask how far do their roots branch out?
     

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