Rhizopogon

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Margot, Apr 1, 2021.

  1. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    When I first dug up a few of these little fungal balls 5 years ago, I thought maybe I'd stumbled on Oregon White Truffles. No such luck. They are neat though - from what I've read, I suspect these are probably connected to ectomycorrhiza associated with Douglas Fir trees but there are literally dozens and dozens of Rhizopogon species. From Wikipedia: Through their ectomycorrhizal relationships Rhizopogon are thought to play an important role in the ecology of coniferous forests.

    I was in touch with Dr. Shannon Berch in 2016 who was willing to sequence the spores but I never did find any balls with mature spores. Just an another gardening surprise - False Truffles!
     

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2021
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  2. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yup I think finding all truffles, all hypogeus fungi, is a great experience!
     
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  3. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Really enjoyed this thread Margot, I was reading about the price of truffles last year and it is ridiculous what people are willing to pay for them.
    But what J @Frog said, "a great experience" and you shared this with us all. Thankyou
     
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