Identification: red dissectum

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Riverdale27, Jun 1, 2021.

  1. Riverdale27

    Riverdale27 Active Member

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    Hi guys,

    I got an acer from my mom a few years ago, back when an acer was just another plant to me... (I know... young and stupid ;-)).

    I threw away the tag and I just cant' remember what kind of tree it was. Something in my mind tells me it had "japonicum" on the tag, but I can't see how this one would be a japonicum to be honest.

    Can anybody see what type this might be?

    It's clearly a dissectum, but I'm thinking about the standard dissectum, maybe an Inaba Shidare, but I find it extremely hard to tell with these dissectums.
     

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  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Hi Kurt, tbh I don't think it's dark enough for Inaba shidare, but I've just this taken a photo of my 'Crimson Queen' for you to compare.
    20210601_160219.jpg
     
  3. Riverdale27

    Riverdale27 Active Member

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    Could just as well be one, but it's so difficult to tell. I don't know why they name these species if they all look the same?
     
  4. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    That's exactly why I didn't reply : some cultivars are so similar, unless they're clearly identified by their port or any other clue, it's almost impossible to tell which is which.

    Here are three photos I've just taken of my 'Dissectum atropurpureum' : it's grafted, so I suppose it has a "sexier" name, yet I think I'll never know - but who really cares ? And though they were taken a few seconds from each other, from a different angle, the exposur to the light make the leaves look a bit different :

    acerp_atro-dis02_210601a.jpg acerp_atro-dis02_210601b.jpg acerp_atro-dis02_210601c.jpg
     
  5. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    The leaves look too dissected and "feathery" for 'Inaba shidare' and the branches don't look right. It reminds me of 'Dissectum Nigrum' but as others say above there are many cultivars with a similar look. If it was to be 'Dissectum Nigrum' the most notable distinguishing feature is visible in the early spring when the new shoots and opening leaves are covered in a fine silvery pubescence.
     
  6. Riverdale27

    Riverdale27 Active Member

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    I think we have a winner then. Look at these early leaves...?
     

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  7. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Here's mine for reference, bud and leaf + flower:

    Dissectum Nigrum.jpg Dissectum Nigrum3.jpg

    Some of the other dissectum forms have a slight pubescence but on 'Dissectum Nigrum' it is really striking if you view it on the right day.
     
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  8. Riverdale27

    Riverdale27 Active Member

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    Oh wow yours already is flowering, nice! Seems to me it could just as well be a Dissectum Nigrum... but if I would sell it one day I guess nobody can see the difference anyhow.

    Do acers only flower after a given number of years? I see large trees often flowering and producing seeds, but sometimes I also see it on small ones. Is it an age thing?
     
  9. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    It is a little bit Kurt, but mostly it's some do and some don't scenario.
     
  10. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Also, because grafted plants are essentially clones they are already old when they are "young" plants so that is why some of them flower when still small.

    Japanese maples grown from seed generally take longer to flower. I noticed flowers and samaras on some of mine about 20 years after planting the seeds but I imagine this could probably be reduced quite a bit with better growing conditions.
     

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