Propagation: Recently planted Mirte is now flowering

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Cjart, Oct 8, 2014.

  1. Cjart

    Cjart Active Member

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    I recently planted a 3 gallon sized Mirte Japanese Maple in my yard. It was planted approximately 1 month ago. (2nd week of September here in Boise Idaho) It had a lot of scorched leaves when I purchased it from a nearby nursery and it proceeded to drop most of its leaves. It has now leafed out again and also has several bunches of blossoms as well. I am concerned that it might be really damaged with the coming frost. Average date of first frost is 10-11 to 10-20 here. I have included some photos. Is there anything I should do to protect it, or is that possible?
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Maybe imported from the southern hemisphere and therefore off schedule. Will have to cover with frost proof plant shelter when freezing temperatures threaten, otherwise existing new growth will be lost and branches may die back - if bacterial blight gets into damaged shoots (and it's the perfect time of year for the pathogen to strike) most or all of this small specimen may be destroyed. Independent garden centers here sell various manufactured shelters, otherwise you will have to rig something up yourself.
     
  3. Cjart

    Cjart Active Member

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    Thanks Ron for the information. The tag says the tree is from Bucholz Nursery which I think is in Oregon. Somehow, it is mixed up though. We will try to rig something up for it.
     
  4. emery

    emery Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Mirte is a pretty tough cultivar, it might die back some but should probably be OK. The flowers are a bit bizarre but probably nothing major to worry about. Perhaps it has been kept in a greenhouse during the winter? Not likely that any new growth will survive though. I'd make sure to spray it with copper or a Bordeaux mix as soon as it gets cold and every 6 weeks until there is no more risk of frost.

    -E
     
  5. Cjart

    Cjart Active Member

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    Thanks Emery. I have never used a Bordeaux mixture or copper before, so this will be educational. I have 2 other even smaller japanese maples not yet planted. (I live one block away from a large nursery and they are hard to resist). They are also budding (but not blooming) because they were overheated in the greenhouse and lost leaves-one is Rhode Island Red and the other is Kumoi Nishiki. I guess it wouldn't hurt to also treat them as well?
     
  6. emery

    emery Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Bordeaux mix is good stuff, can't see how it would hurt.

    A. sieboldianum 'Kumoi nishiki' is a very choice cultivar and though I don't have one (not through lack of trying!) in general the species is tougher than A. palmatum. Bucholz doesn't indicate there is anything specially delicate about it, though perhaps someone who grows it might have a better idea. 'Rhode Island Red' should be robust, also; again I don't grow it.

    The main problem you'll have, like with the Mirte is that they haven't been hardened off for your climate. Really too bad the nursery is treating them this way because it puts them at a real disadvantage for getting established in the landscape. Were I you, I'd consider keeping the other 2 in pots and hardening them off this winter, if you have an unheated garage or something you could store them there and then plant in spring after the danger of frost is past. This has some disadvantages for next year's watering and the development of the root system, but might well come out ahead in the long run.

    cheers,

    -E
     
  7. ROEBUK

    ROEBUK Rising Contributor Maple Society

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    Firstly must say that is one excellent tree you have bought there,very well branched and will develop nicely over the coming years.What i think you will find though is next year the leaves will be quite thinly spread out on the branches, and will revert to a redy/orange colour through out the year and only in 2016 will it take on the bushy well leafed and seasonly coloured appearence: ie beautiful chocolate colours in spring then olive green in summer and finally stunning fire orange/red very pretty.

    Regards the new leaf growth nothing to worry about mine does this every year,looks quite unusual various long branches with big clusters of new growths see pics of mine, just gives another interpretation/variation of Acers to look at. Out of all of my trees this is the only one to do this !!

    Protection wise i just re mulch the ground every two years, a good 4/5" of pine bark chippings plus all of the leaves that have dropped during the fall get mixed in as well.

    Obviously here in the UK we don't have the harsh winters like you in the US, so i couldn't really state what would be good for you.

    Once all the leaves have fallen off mine i just give them all a feed of liquid seaweed and that's it for the year, i am of the opinion if you have bought good reliable healthy hardy stock from reputable nurseries you should let them fend for themselves and you should have no problems.Works for me !!!
     

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  8. Cjart

    Cjart Active Member

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    Thanks Roebuck, I saw it earlier in the nursery when it was looking very pretty. When the nursery had their end of season sale, it was really scorched, but from what I had read about the cultivar, I thought it would someday be pretty again. The summer here was extremely hot and dry so I think a lot of maples were affected. Your pictures of your tree are really encouraging! Our winters are usually milder than the rest of Idaho. We are zone 6b. We will have snow and the ground will freeze. Sometimes it gets below zero but it is not every year. I have had other japanese maples do okay. I have Beni Schichihenge, Garnet, Aureum, Autumn Moon, and Twombley's Sentinel that came through okay last winter. Have planted quite a few small ones this summer, all are said to be okay to zone 5, but we will see, I will take all the advice here and hope for the best. I am really getting addicted to Japanese Maples!
     

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