Problem with my bamboo plant

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by eksit, Nov 8, 2021.

  1. eksit

    eksit Member

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    There's this odd thing that's growing on my bamboo plant. It looks like worms, but it's not. It's actually part of the plant (it's hard, not movable). Does anyone know what this is and should I cut it off? Thanks!
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Hard to tell for sure from the photo but those may be aerial roots.
     
  3. eksit

    eksit Member

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    Thanks for the reply! I did a search on Google using "aerial roots bamboo" and there are lots of results.
     
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    The plant's botanical name is Dracaena sanderiana. It is not a true bamboo so you may want to be more selective in your searches.
     
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  5. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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  6. eksit

    eksit Member

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    Yeah, my bamboo looks very similar to the one in that post. I'm going to follow the answer there and replant the stem. Thanks so much for pointing me in the right direction. I spent quite a bit of time trying to think of keywords to search for and didn't get any good hits before. So knowing to search for "aerial roots" helped a lot.
     
  7. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    The roots on the bigger of the stems appears to be sufficient but you may want to encourage the roots to develop further before separating the stem from the mother plant. You can do that by using the air-layering technique of wrapping the area with moistened sphagnum moss and allowing the roots to grow into it. Both stems can then be separated and planted as a unit in one operation.
     
  8. eksit

    eksit Member

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    OK, I'll try out the air-layering technique. Thanks.
     
  9. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Please let us know how it turns out.
     
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