Problem with almond tree

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by eza, Sep 9, 2015.

  1. eza

    eza New Member

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    Location:
    Poland
    Hello everyone,

    I live in south-west Poland, near Wroclaw (zone 7b). This year I planted the almond tree (var. Supernova grafted on peach rootstock). I know that it can have problem with surviving the winter in this hardiness zone, but I decided to try.

    The leaves of almond does not look good, particularly the old ones. They are yellowish with green veins, some of the are almost brown with necrotic (?) parts.

    There are two photos in attachment. One presents the outside and the second - the underside of two leaves.

    The soil in my garden is quite loamy. This summer was relatively hot and dry, literally no rain for whole August, so I watered the almond tree every two days with about 4 liters of water.

    Could you say what is wrong with my tree? Thank you in advance for the answer.

    Sorry for mistakes in my English, it is my second language.

    Best regards.
     

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  2. Arclight

    Arclight New Member

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    Location:
    San Diego, CA United States
    You have some necrosis on the leaf tips, and the shade of green seems to look like it's turning yellow.

    Can you take a picture of the entire tree? Also, tell me what kind of almond tree it is.

    I also wouldn't mind any recent soil tests (the newer the better) that you may have had, and some meteorological data.

    What irrigation method are you using?
     
  3. eza

    eza New Member

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    It is Prunus dulcis var. Supernova.

    I don't have any soil test. Basing on the available data (maps of soil properties, put on web by the local government), it is brown soil, slightly acidic (pH 5,5 - 6,5 - that should be true because rhododendrons and hydrangeas grow very good) with low level of magnesium and potassium, normal level of sulphur and zinc and high level of organic matter.

    First time, I fertilized this tree after planting it in garden, with the rooting mineral fertilizer (5% N; 13% P; 10% Mg; 0,02% B; 0,02% Cu; 0,07% Cu; 0,04% Mn; 0,004% Mo; 0,015% Zn). When I noticed first symptoms of yellowing leaves, I added NPK with Mg and S (twice) but it didn't seem to help.

    As for the weather data, it is available here . The general climate data are available here . Concerning the temperature, this year, August and July were much above the average (+ 3 to 4 C), June and May were average (tree was planted in May). Concerning the precipitation, August and July were extremely below the average (about 40% of standard value), June was average, and May was slightly below.

    I irrigate in the evening, with rainwater, kept in plastic barrels, using watering pot.

    More photos in attachment.
     

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  4. bjo

    bjo Active Member 10 Years

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    Eza,

    i have some thoughts on this:

    1. I wonder if the roots have grown out much since planting or whether they are restricted to a small soil volume ( was the tree pot-grown ?)

    2. i would maintain a much wider circle clear of grass around the tree - grass can be a surprisingly strong competitor for water and nutrients.

    3. probably not relevant to the problem, but I would water less frequently but a greater volume each time. During the summer I give mine about 20 litres once every two weeks.

    Hopefully your tree will survive the winter, and then I suspect that it may grow away much more happily.... this year it is just settling in.

    My almond trees are already dropping leaves probably due to drought (no measurable rain since April) - i would be very happy if they looked as good as yours !

    boa sorte
    Brian
     
  5. eza

    eza New Member

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    Thank you for answering.

    The tree was pot-grown, but now the roots can grow without restaints. I put a lot of rich soil in the pit during the trasplantation. In case of other plants, there is no problem with root spreading, but I know that it should not be compared. I rather don't have a possibility to check it. Do you know if the almond roots are shallow or deep growing?

    The change of watering pattern is a very good idea for future. It really makes sense for plants which are susceptible to root rotting. I will use it in the next dry season because it has already started to rain.

    Concerning grass, on the one hand, you are right, but on the other hand, the grass will give protection against cold. Perhaps I will remove more grass next spring and see what happen.

    I also hope that it is only the initial period of growing and not a more serious problem.

    Best wishes for you and your trees.
     
  6. bjo

    bjo Active Member 10 Years

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    Hello Eza,

    the depth of the main spread of roots depends on the rootstock - the deepest are with almond rootstocks. You have a peach rootstock and the roots will be quite shallow - I would expect most of the roots to be within 50cm of the surface (although some will be deeper).

    In relation to the grass, perhaps you could widen the circle but protect the roots and the crown from frost with a deep organic mulch - which would also help in the dry season next year.

    The theory for infrequent watering is to try and force the roots to grow deeper. Frequent watering with small volumes tends to encourage root growth near the surface.

    good luck
    brian
     
  7. Delvi83

    Delvi83 Active Member

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    Location:
    Novara, Italy
    May be there isn't enought iron in the soil? But, i don't think it's a big problem...the plant is still young and needs grow better to get all nutrients !!!
     

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