Piggyback plant

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Woodsprite, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. Woodsprite

    Woodsprite Active Member

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    Hi

    I purchased a 4inch piggyback plant about 3 months ago. I don't know the scientific name for it. It was quite lovely and very green. Its leaves have been drying out and getting brown. They don't seem to be dying off but the new growth seems to be limited. I have it in front of an eastern window with about 4 hours of diffused sunlight, water it when the first inch of soil dries and feed it about every two weeks with Shultz instant for indoor plants .

    I really like this plants and haven't been able to find one in about 10 or 15 years. I would sure hate to lose it.

    Help!

    Nancy
     
  2. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    Woodsprite,

    Tolmiea menziesii (Piggyback plant)

    I keep mine in diffused light like you and it also gets just a "little bit" of sun near the end of the day near a west window. It gets watered thoroughly when it gets pretty close to dry, not too dry though, or the leaves can wilt right down over the pot.Make sure the soil is well draining too so it's not staying too wet for too long.

    You might be fertilizing too much. I use a very diluted powder form fertilizer just once in a while for all my plants. Too much can make the ends of some plants turn brown and crispy.Hard-water can also but I have hard-water and it doesn't hurt this plant.
    Try just straight water for a while when ther soil feels almost dry, and see if there isn't an improvement.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Check for mites.
     
  4. Woodsprite

    Woodsprite Active Member

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    Bluewing, do you move your plant to the west window or do you recommend I keep it in a west window? I don't have southern light access.
    I think your right about the overfeeding, for convenience I sometimes feed all of my plants at once. Going to tag this one with a reminder!

    Ron B, think I might have this problem too. It seems that here in Maine that problem occurs at this time every year. I really have a tough time controlling it, going through lots of soil changes. Is there an easier way? If so, please clue me in!

    thanks

    Nancy
     
  5. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    Woodsprite,

    A southern exposure would be too strong and hot anyway and probably burn the leaves.
    Medium (bright indirect) which seems to be what your giving your piggy should be fine, If the light is maybe too low or too indirect, that can effect the leaves and growth. You said the new growth was limited, so like Ron mentioned, ck for pest, if you don't see anything, maybe a little bit more "indirect brighter light" will help, (off to the side) of a brighter, or sunnier window.
     
  6. Woodsprite

    Woodsprite Active Member

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    Yikes! It has gnats. Every year since I've lived here these gnats plague my plants. So far I've not had success with thier extermination. They usually die out around November.
    I've tried lemon juice, fly strips, houseplant insect spray, letting soil dry out between waterings and repotting in sterile soil (including rinsing off the plants' roots and foliage before transplanting and thoroughly washing and sterilizing the pots).
    Not sure what to do next, don't want to lose this cute little plant.
     
  7. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    I have never tried it for gnats, but I have read where some people swear by it. It's called, (Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis) It's Odor free, biological larvicide, safe for people, pets, including birds. It kills the larvae in the soil and stops the breeding cycle that can make people NUTS! I once saw a few fly out of my washer when I opened the lid to do some laudry! They must have lost their way and found some moist humidity in there! If your have a bad infestation, you may need to use it a few times as a soil drench on your regular watering schedule.
     
  8. Woodsprite

    Woodsprite Active Member

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    ...Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis?

    Thanks Bluewing, I guess I'll start my quest for this stuff right away!

    Nancy
     

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