1. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    I have three Asamina Triloba trees in my backyard in Vancouver. They are not self-fertile but I know that all three are different varieties (one is NC-1; I don't recall the other two).

    Two are quite mature: about 5 m tall. But only one of them has ever flowered. And not even every year: every few years it produces several flowers. That is all.

    None of the flowers has ever led to a fruit.

    I assume that if another one flowered. they might fertilize each other and I would get fruits. But I can't understand why only one will flower, or why it only flowers every few years. Any ideas, anyone? .
     
  2. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Asamina triloba grows in places that have hot, humid summers. Our cool, dry summers could inhibit development of flower buds. I wonder if anyone has harvested Paw Paws in the Lower Mainland of BC.
     
  3. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    UBCBG has ten or so planted ten or twelve years ago. I posted photos of one of the trees this year at August 2018 in the garden. It has not been posted before, and I don't recall seeing it before, so I don't know if any of them have flowered or fruited. VanDusen Botanical Garden has two, from 1973 and 1993; again, I don't know if they get flowers and fruit, but I've asked a docent there.
     
  4. WoodRoseThorn

    WoodRoseThorn New Member

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    There are some people in Sidney, Vancouver Island growing Paw Paw. They have a YouTube channel: Fruit Trees and More. There is a video on Paw Paw there. If I remember correctly, we don't have the correct insect/bird to pollinate and it must be done by hand.
     
  5. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Kevin Kubeck, the Nursery Manager here at UBCBG brought a sack to work last fall from his trees. They were ripe and quite tasty. He said he thought the reason he was getting good fruit for the last 4 years was mostly to do with the trees finally reaching maturity. They are not self fertile, so do need to be cross pollinated by another plant. The pollinators are flies and beetles, so those are the ones to encourage.
     
    wcutler likes this.
  6. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Thanks, Eric. Do you know if Kevin's trees are grown in the open or in a greenhouse or some other shelter?
     
  7. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    Eric, pollination by hand is only possible if both trees have flowered, no?
     
  8. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yes, one would most likely need two different plants flowering at the same time to get fruit--self fertile cultivars are rare. I don't know, but doubt that Kevin pollinates his trees by hand. Fertilizer that attracts flies can be applied at flowering time.
     
  9. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    This past spring they all flowered, two of them at almost - but not quite - the same time. I watched a youtube video about fertilizing them by hand and it didn't look very hard but alas I was a bit late. I have high hopes for the coming spring.

    One of them is starting to get very very tall.
     
  10. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    What is this, that I see
    appearing on my Paw Paw tree?

    [​IMG]
     
  11. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The image doesn't show up on my computer.
     
  12. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    I encountered this problem, when I pasted .../image_name.jpg.html type link instead of .../image_name.jpg. It is impossible to remove or correct this tag later. It does not show up in the edit window.
    Even if to write only the tag and post the message, then it is impossible to correct it later.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. pmurphy

    pmurphy Active Member

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    My understanding is that squirrels love the fruit; there is a gentleman in New West that not only grows pawpaw but is able to harvest quantities of them yearly but he says he has a heck of a time keeping the squirrels from the fruit so he puts small wire cages over the developing fruit (not an easy task). And my pawpaws even had fruit developing on them for the first time this year until the squirrels arrived.....no fruit any more.
     
  14. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    Hopeless. I can't post photos to save my life.

    Anyway, I did my best to fertilize some blossoms on each of my three trees with pollen from another tree and to my surprise, 2-3 weeks ago a cluster of fruit appeared on my smallest tree.

    I assumed that was all. But yesterday I went out to trim a broken branch that I noticed on the tallest tree and to my astonishment I found 6 clusters of 2-4 fruits all growing well. Some of them I can tell, from their location, were NOT fertilized by yours truly. I reckon some insect done done so.

    Out of curiosity, it trees have to be fertilized by a tree of a different variety, every fruit is different from the fruits of the two trees that contributed to its creation, no? Or am I displaying my total ignorance of genetics.
     
  15. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Have you had a look at Attach photos and files
    If that doesn't help and you can tell me where it goes wrong, I could add a note.
     
  16. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Soccerdad, cross-fertilization doesn't usually affect the fruit, which should be determined by the genes of the tree bearing the fruit. It will only affect the genetics of the seeds and any resulting seedlings.
     

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