Over Fertilizating a tree

Discussion in 'Magnoliaceae' started by vernon, Aug 2, 2008.

  1. vernon

    vernon Member

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    omaha, ne USA
    I accidently overfertilized a new magnolia tree that was planted this spring. I used fertilization spikes. I used 5 and should only have used 2 at the most. I also drove them into the ground way too close to the trunk. Less than a week later, the leaves were turning black and falling off. Even leaves that aren't turned black are falling off. Is there anything I can do that will save the tree? I tried to dig the spikes back out, but they had already dissolved into the ground. I have been watering excessively to try to wash the fertilizer out, but am not sure if there is anything else I can do. Please help!
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Maples are prone to pathogens that turn them black, maybe it was the fertilizer and maybe not. To get it away from the fertilizer, dig it up and wash the roots, replant in different soil.

    Fertilizer spikes are inefficient and should not be used anyway. It is preferable to broadcast granular fertilizer over the soil surface. Do this when a need for fertilizing is indicated by a soil test, using a preparation that supplies the needed nutrients in the right amounts. Do not fertilize just to see what will happen or on the assumption that what a particular product supplies is going to be needed.
     
  3. kaspian

    kaspian Active Member 10 Years

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    Just to note: the poster is talking here about a magnolia tree (though this is the maple forum). Does the same advice apply?
     
  4. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Yes, the valid reasoning Ron gives does apply
    to both plants. More so likely to see fertilizer
    burn cause black discoloration on new growth
    Maple tips and leaves but we can also see the
    black discoloration on Magnolia new growth
    as well but not nearly as prevalent or as readily
    as we may see the burn occur in Maples.

    Jim
     
  5. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Here ye, here ye.

    :)
     

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