November 2022 in the garden - quite the spectacle

Discussion in 'Talk about UBC Botanical Garden' started by wcutler, Nov 1, 2022.

  1. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Douglas Justice's blog for November is up at November in the Garden 2022 - UBC Botanical Garden,
    and as usual, there are lots of good photos there. I got distracted around the food garden, and then my phone (camera) battery died (so glad that happened before my upcoming Honolulu trip, so I have a new battery now), which is to repeat, see the blog for what Douglas says is of interest now. Here are a couple of plants mentioned in the blog.

    Disanthus cercidifolius has been a favourite for several years, usually with thin little flowers completely hidden under the leaves, but this year, they decided to show off. The fruits are white heart-shaped things, so I don't know what exactly is the white thing in the third photo.
    Disanthus cercidifolius_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_142338.jpg Disanthus cercidifolius_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_142501.jpg Disanthus cercidifolius_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_142944.jpg Disanthus cercidifolius_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_143119.jpg

    Montauk daisy (spelling corrected, as per Ron B's posting), Nipponanthemum nipponicum, in the Asian Garden, has just a few flowers.
    Nipponanthemum nipponicum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_141845.jpg Nipponanthemum nipponicum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_141853.jpg

    Back to coloured leaves, I didn't get to walk over to the Liquidambar styraciflua on the main lawn in the North Garden, but these were easy to see. They are common on our city streets and parks.
    Liquidambar styraciflua_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_151533.jpg

    Parthenocissus tricuspidata, Boston ivy, on the trellis next to the food garden, is looking splendid. There are two cultivars listed there, 'Lowii' and 'Veitchii', the latter of which, according to Garden Explorer, has a common name of Japanese ivy, and it doesn't mention Boston ivy as a common name. I don't know which this is; the last photo might show both of them. This was not written up in the blog. Edited: I see that in 2019 I posted this one with the red leaves as the 'Lowii' cultivar, so I must have seen the label then. There is also P. quinquefolia in there as well, still with green leaves. Wow, spellcheck corrected my original spelling of quinquefolia.
    Parthenocissus-tricuspidata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145715.jpg Parthenocissus-tricuspidata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145155.jpg Parthenocissus-tricuspidata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145301.jpg Parthenocissus-tricuspidata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_150311.jpg
    This might be Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Robusta', on the walkway up to the Garden Pavilion.
    Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Robusta' _UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_150936.jpg Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Robusta' _UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_151004.jpg

    That's Asimina triloba peeking over the wall under the Parthenocissus in the first photo. I forget what Linda Layne told me - maybe it had a flower, but it did not have any fruits.
    Asimina triloba_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145536.jpg Asimina triloba_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145615.jpg

    While I'm doing yellow leaves, here is Celastrus scandens, along the north fence in the North Garden.
    Celastrus scandens_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_152903.jpg Celastrus scandens_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_152926.jpg Celastrus scandens_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_152934.jpg Celastrus scandens_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_153007.jpg Celastrus scandens_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_153029.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2022
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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  3. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    @Ron B, thanks for noticing that the spelling should be Montauk daisy. I have corrected it above, and Douglas thanks you and will correct it in the blog.
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I mentioned getting distracted in the food garden last week. Here are some Brassicaceae flowers.
    Diplotaxus tenuifolia, an arugula or wall-rocket with flowers that I didn't recognize for that.
    Diplotaxus tenuifolia_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145416.jpg Diplotaxus tenuifolia_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145422.jpg

    Next to these was Brassica oleracea (Alboglabra Group) 'Green Pearl', common name Gai Lan.
    Brassica oleracea Green Pearl-Gai Lan_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145440.jpg Brassica oleracea Green Pearl-Gai Lan_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_145453.jpg

    The other food garden distractions were fruits. Here is Aronia melanocarpa, chokeberry. These were past their prime, but they were still juicy and tasty. It didn't seem that any were missing from the shrub - are birds not at all interested in these?
    Aronia melanocarpa - Black chokeberry_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_150639.jpg Aronia melanocarpa - Black chokeberry_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_150731.jpg

    I only found one persimmon on the Diospyros kaki 'Izu', not ripe yet.
    Diospyros kaki Izu_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_150528.jpg Diospyros kaki Izu_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_150614.jpg

    The other fruits that interested me are not edible - I think this is Ilex verticillata, though I did not find the label this time.
    Ilex verticillata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_152259.jpg Ilex verticillata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_152318.jpg Ilex verticillata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_152330.jpg Ilex verticillata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_152334.jpg Ilex verticillata_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_152340.jpg

    I'll end with a spectacular (for colour) Juglans nigra.
    Juglans nigra_UBCBG_Cutler_20221026_151624.jpg
     
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  5. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    I got my chance on November 24, and the sun even came out. This is Liquidambar styraciflua 'Lane Roberts', which never seems to have many fruits. I thought there was only one, but then I did find two more. But it has a beautiful shape and the dense autumn foliage is eye-catching from quite a distance.
    Liquidambar styraciflua 'Lane Roberts'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_133904.jpg Liquidambar styraciflua 'Lane Roberts'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_133718.jpg Liquidambar styraciflua 'Lane Roberts'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_133746.jpg

    Liquidambar styraciflua 'Worplesdon' has lost many of its leaves, but it has lots of fruits from this year and still from last year. It has a few new suckers.
    Liquidambar styraciflua 'Worplesdon'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_133907.jpg Liquidambar styraciflua 'Worplesdon'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_143624.jpg Liquidambar styraciflua 'Worplesdon'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_134042.jpg Liquidambar styraciflua 'Worplesdon'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_143649.jpg
    Liquidambar styraciflua 'Worplesdon'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_143700.jpg Liquidambar styraciflua 'Worplesdon'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_143726.jpg Liquidambar styraciflua 'Worplesdon'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_143743.jpg

    There were more than one, easier to see with no leaves.
    Diospyros kaki 'Izu'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_133559.jpg Diospyros kaki 'Izu'_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_133559c.jpg
     
  6. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    In the October Sorbus thread, I wrote:
    This was even more spectacular this week, with huge dense fruit clusters standing out against the autumn coloured leaves. Douglas Justice assures me that the two trees growing from the stump are the same species, but one (third photo) had almost no fruits, and the ones it had are gone now. Of course, maybe its fruits were more attractive to birds, but that still doesn't make a case for its being the same species.
    Sorbus-sargentiana_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_150718.jpg Sorbus-sargentiana_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_132328.jpg Sorbus-sargentiana_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_132313.jpg

    The yellow leaves to the left belong to Lindera obtusiloba.
    Lindera obtusiloba and Sorbus-sargentiana_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_132422.jpg Lindera obtusiloba_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_132434.jpg Lindera obtusiloba_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_150754.jpg
    I've been overwhelmed by how the photo colours have varied today on the same plants. At least in the previous three, the last one was taken 90 minutes after the other two. I tried what I thought was fairly extreme editing, but I can't come close to the impression I had when I was there.

    Now that I'm into yellow, here is Liriodendron tulipifera, in the Carolinian forest.
    Liriodendron tulipifera_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145621.jpg Liriodendron tulipifera_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145643.jpg
    This tree, same species, looks totally different in habit, leaf shape and autumn colouring.
    Liriodendron tulipifera_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145814.jpg Liriodendron tulipifera_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145849.jpg

    Nearby is Larix laricina.
    Larix laricina_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145708.jpg Larix laricina_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145738.jpg

    In the Australian section of the E.H. Lohbrunner Alpine Garden (this is a hint to next month's blog) is this young Nothofagus antarctica.
    Nothofagus antarctica_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_141400.jpg Nothofagus antarctica_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_141417.jpg Nothofagus antarctica_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_141421.jpg
     
  7. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Just a few more to wrap up November. Oxydendrum arboreum was even in the blog this month. I must have been too early on my last visit, as I didn't find them at all. This week, I found one with red leaves, and I didn't realize it even was this species. It has no fruits.
    Oxydendrum arboreum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_144645.jpg Oxydendrum arboreum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_144704.jpg
    The older trees were sort of a dull yellow. But they had a lot of fruits, now dried up.
    Oxydendrum arboreum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_144950.jpg Oxydendrum arboreum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145006.jpg

    The Franklinia alatamaha is eye-catching, good colour and decorated with white buds.
    Franklinia alatamaha_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145500.jpg Franklinia alatamaha_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145511.jpg Franklinia alatamaha_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_145549.jpg

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides have coloured up nicely,
    Metasequoia glyptostroboides_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_144012.jpg
    as have Taxodium distichum. Both are deciduous conifers. The first two photos are the same individual, I think.
    Taxodium distichum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_144010.jpg Taxodium distichum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_144331.jpg Taxodium distichum_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_144210.jpg

    Euonymus europaeus fruits are so decorative.
    Euonymus europaeus_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_143426.jpg Euonymus europaeus_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_143431.jpg

    Here is one more, from the Asian Garden, Enkianthus campanulatus var. sikokianus.
    Enkianthus campanulatus var. sikokianus_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_132848.jpg Enkianthus campanulatus var. sikokianus_UBCBG_Cutler_20221124_132904.jpg
     

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